11 Good Questions To Ask Recruiters At A Career Fair

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the right questions to ask at a career fair can significantly improve your chances of walking away from the event with realistic job prospects. Unfortunately, many attendees ask the same surface-level questions and leave empty-handed. This list of good questions to ask at a career fair will transform these events from being hit or miss, to a promising source of opportunity. 1.Ask Them About Your Desired Role. Before you even step foot into the career fair, you should take some time to familiarize yourself with what companies will attend (and which ones you're interested in). Do some research on your own time and see what positions are available. The last thing you want to do is waste a recruiter's time asking about job...... Read more

Ask these six questions to find the workplace culture for you

By VA Careers | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and a greater interest in pursuing a career that matters, the idea of finding a "culture fit" at work has never been more significant than it is today. Finding a workplace that fits your values and work ethic can make a huge difference, not just for you but for the organization as a whole. The skills and experience you bring to the table can be best utilized if you feel like you belong. Defining "culture fit". There are many competing discussions about how to define "culture fit" and its impact on the workplace and hiring. But at its core, culture fit is the likelihood that you'll mesh with the core values of an organization. At VA, we define our culture by an easy acronym, I CARE. Taken...... Read more

15 High Income Skills To Learn In 2022 (Without A Degree)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

These days there are a number of high income skills that can put you in a great position financially, but also give you a tremendous amount of flexibility in your life. But which ones should you consider first? This list of the most profitable skills to learn will point you in the right direction. No matter what your background is or what your preferences are, you'll surely find one below that appeals to you! 1. SEO. A strong Internet presence is a must in today's tech-focused world. Companies need to invest in their digital footprint, creating well-designed websites that can bring in more business. Whether a company is selling products directly to consumers or providing a service to B2B clients, ranking highly in search engines is incredibly important...... Read more

Veteran earns six figures, advances his career with Salesforce Military

By Dr. Tracy L. Weistreich | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

During a lunch break — of 20 minutes — Willie Wright not only completed a training through Salesforce Military but also discovered a learning opportunity that could actively apply to his current work. "This program has been life-changing for me and I'm happy to help anyone that's willing to take part in this journey," Wright said. "Salesforce Military has changed a lot of Veterans' lives and if nothing else, helped them get into a career that might have otherwise been unavailable." Wright started his journey with Salesforce Military in October 2019 and by March the following year, he was in a new role earning more than $100,000 annually. The Trailhead Military program provides active military, Veterans, and respective spouses free training, exams, certifications, and career opportunities for high-paying tech jobs... Read more

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11 Good Questions To Ask Recruiters At A Career Fair

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the right questions to ask at a career fair can significantly improve your chances of walking away from the event with realistic job prospects. Unfortunately, many attendees ask the same surface-level questions and leave empty-handed.

This list of good questions to ask at a career fair will transform these events from being hit or miss, to a promising source of opportunity.

Ask Them About Your Desired Role

Before you even step foot into the career fair, you should take some time to familiarize yourself with what companies will attend (and which ones you're interested in). Do some research on your own time and see what positions are available. The last thing you want to do is waste a recruiter's time asking about job availability.

Instead of asking the same rudimentary questions everyone else asks, focus on the details of the positions that interest you. Career fairs are an excellent opportunity to get more insight into potential roles before you enter any part of the hiring process. Think of it as a pre-interview interview!

Some of the best questions to ask at a career fair are about specifics in the job description or aspects of the role that the posting didn't mention at all. Now is your time to get clarity and see if the position is right for you. It's also an excellent time to let the recruiter know if you meet the job's qualifications.

Try asking questions like:

  • "What does the [open position] do in a typical day?"
  • "The description for this position mentioned specific qualifications and functions. Can you provide more information about [topic you want more clarification about]?"
  • "What are the challenges you hope a new [open position] can solve?"
Ask Them About Products & Services The Company Offers

Do you at least have a high level understanding of what products and services the company offers? If not, do some homework before you go to the job fair. This will allow you to ask more informed questions that will give you valuable insight, but also leave a great first impression.

Recruiters love to see applicants that have done their due diligence and will relish the opportunity to discuss details. It shows initiative and helps to create a more personal connection. They're also more likely to be interested in hiring someone who has a basic understanding of the company's products and services than an applicant who's going in completely blind.

And if you have any genuine personal experience with the product or service, don't be afraid to mention it!

You can ask:

  • "What was it like at the company during the development of [product/service]?"
  • "I saw that the company recently released [product/service]. How do you think it will play into the company's strategy moving forward?"
  • "I love your latest [name of product/service], are there plans to enhance it?"
Ask About The Company Culture

Company culture matters no matter what industry you enter or what position you apply for within an organization. You're going to spend a big part of your life immersing yourself in this work. It's perfectly reasonable to learn more about what it's like to be a part of the company.

You're not trying to grill recruiters or find something terrible to make you want to rescind an application. The goal of asking these questions at a career fair is to determine if you can fit seamlessly within the organization. Some environments are laid back, and some are very professional. Some are highly collaborative, and others require a lot of work on your own.

Whatever the case may be, the company culture will have a significant impact on your experience.

Use your better judgment when asking these questions at a career fair. Many recruiters have rehearsed answers to paint the company in the best light possible. Pay attention to more than just the verbal responses. Consider body language, and don't be afraid to research the company culture a bit on your own time as well.

Some job seekers hesitate to ask these types of questions, but it's better to find out now than waste time later.

Here are some excellent questions worth asking:

  • "What type of person finds success at [company]?"
  • "What does your organization do to support diversity?"
  • "In what ways does [company] foster communication, and what kind of culture is there surrounding feedback?"
Ask About The Industry

It always pays to be well-informed about the industry you're trying to enter, and hearing the thoughts of someone at the company can be very helpful. If you're already part of the industry, these questions will likely come naturally to you. But even if you aren't, do a little research to help you know what to say at a career fair.

Check out the organization's media page to learn more about its changing strategies or new initiatives. Then, familiarize yourself with developing trends. Every industry experiences change.

Companies have to evolve with the transforming landscape. Having some insight into the industry as a whole can help you ask better questions at the job fair.

For example, you can ask questions like:

  • "I saw that [trend] is becoming more prevalent in [industry]. How does your company plan on addressing those changes?"
  • "How do you think that [trend] will impact [company product or service] in the near future?"
  • "Do you believe that [trend] is here to stay?"
Ask About Growth & Career Path Opportunities

Right now, your primary focus might be to simply land a job. However, asking questions related to your future in a company is crucial as well.

You won't want to stay in one position forever. At some point, you'll likely want to earn a promotion or take on new kinds of projects.

During your time with a recruiter, ask about career development opportunities. You don't want to end up in a position with little room for growth.

Asking these questions at a career fair also shows recruiters that you're considering long-term employment with the company and are interested in investing in your future.

Ask questions such as:

  • "Does [company] offer any formal training or mentorship programs to help new hires grow and succeed?"
  • "How does [company] commit to the professional development of employees?"
  • "Does [company] invest in education to upskill or reskill employees?"
Ask About Their Experience At The Company

You don't have to focus solely on yourself when talking to a recruiter. Ultimately, the goal is to build long-term relationships that help you further your career. Your interactions with recruiters at a career fair are just the start.

Ask about the recruiter's experience and how they got to where they are! Not only does that show genuine interest in someone else's experiences, but it can give you some valuable insight into what it's like working and progressing within the organization.

You have the opportunity to talk with a person who's actively part of the company you're interested in joining. They're a well of information and can provide a perspective you couldn't get anywhere else.

Here are a few questions to get a good conversation rolling:

  • "How long have you been at [company], and how did you get started?"
  • "What's your favorite part about your role within [company]?"
  • "What's the most challenging obstacle you've had to overcome in your current role?"
Ask About The Training New Hires Go Through

Out of all the questions you can ask at a career fair, this is one of the most overlooked and underrated. As a new hire, you'll likely undergo some training before fully integrating yourself into your position. Knowing what lies ahead can come in handy.

Sometimes this training is general onboarding to familiarize new employees with processes and procedures. In other instances, new hire training is more about skills training.

These questions can help you better understand the hiring timeline. Say, for example, that getting hired would require a move or significant lifestyle change. Knowing what training lies ahead could help you plan the adjustment period to ensure success.

Some might think that it's a little early to ask about training, but those first few weeks and months can set the tone for the future. The answers you get back can also be indicative of how the company values your success.

To prepare, ask questions like:

  • "How long is the training period for [position]?"
  • "Will I have opportunities to shadow coworkers or learn about other roles?"
  • "What does your onboarding training consist of?"
Ask If There Are Additional Skills That Will Help New Hires Succeed

Typically, companies provide a list of skills you need to succeed in an open position. However, those lists aren't perfect and all roles are multi-faceted.

For example, it takes more than just a clever eye for advertisements to excel in marketing. You also have to know how to work in a team, understand creative writing, and master time management. There are many relevant skills to consider.

Ask recruiters about the skills you might need to be the very best in the position you want. Those questions show tons of initiative, indicating that you're ready to do what it takes to be the best employee you can be.

You can also use this information to get a head start on skills you can begin honing now. Even if you don't proceed with an application or get hired, there's a good chance those skills will be helpful in other similar positions. Why not improve now to enhance your prospects later?

Here are a couple to get you started:

  • "Do you recommend any outside training to help me prepare for a job at [company]?"
  • "Will improving [skill] better equip me for [open position]?"
Ask Where You Will Be Working

It's not uncommon for organizations to have multiple offices around the country. Many businesses are going global as well, creating international opportunities. When talking to a recruiter, don't forget to ask about the physical location of your job.

Some companies will move new employees around to different offices to maximize exposure. They may even gauge performance at each branch to decide where to put you permanently. Others will require ongoing travel throughout your tenure, causing you to move from one location to the next.

Of course, many organizations are also offering remote jobs, allowing employees to work at home. Asking this question at a career fair isn't about finding a "right" or "wrong" answer, it's about finding opportunities that align with your needs and goals.

You can ask a question such as:

  • "Does [position] require regular travel? If so, does [company] reimburse travel expenses?"
  • "Are there any opportunities to work some hours at home?"
Ask Them What The Hiring Process Looks Like

Hiring processes differ from one company to the next. At one business you might have a single interview that lasts several hours, while you might need to go through multiple rounds at another!

When talking to recruiters at a career fair, there's nothing wrong with asking about the hiring process. They can provide valuable information that helps you determine whether or not you want to proceed (or give you insight on how to prep). If there's a long process involved and you need a job soon, you may want to consider applying to other opportunities just to be safe.

Questions about the hiring process can also shine a light on the work culture and demands of the position. Recruiters will likely reflect on their own hiring process, giving you a heads up on what to expect. Any piece of information you can get out of the recruiter is helpful.

Good questions to ask include:

  • "Can you tell me a bit about the hiring process for [position]?"
  • "How long does the hiring process typically last?"
Ask When You Can Expect To Hear Back

Last but not least, don't forget to ask when you can expect to hear back about your application and how you can keep in touch. The recruiter can give you a general timeline covering when they begin reviewing applications and getting in touch with applicants. Once again, that comes in handy when thinking about applying for other opportunities.

This is also a great chance to build a long-term professional connection. Ask about how you can stay in touch and what contact method they might prefer.

This will allow you to follow up about your application and inquire about other potential openings in the future. Even if you don't get the job you're after, other opportunities might arise. You never know, so it always pays to reach out!

Ask questions like:

  • "Do you have a business card that I can use to stay in touch about [open position]?"
  • "What's the next step I should take after meeting you here?"
  • "Who can I contact about [open position] or future opportunities at [company]?"

Conclusion

Now that you're familiar with some good questions to ask at a career fair, there's nothing stopping you from taking full advantage of these events. There's no substitute for asking questions and forming a relationship in person, and that's especially true when it comes to the job hunt.

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Ask these six questions to find the workplace culture for you

By VA Careers | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and a greater interest in pursuing a career that matters, the idea of finding a "culture fit" at work has never been more significant than it is today.

Finding a workplace that fits your values and work ethic can make a huge difference, not just for you but for the organization as a whole. The skills and experience you bring to the table can be best utilized if you feel like you belong.

Defining "culture fit"

There are many competing discussions about how to define "culture fit" and its impact on the workplace and hiring. But at its core, culture fit is the likelihood that you'll mesh with the core values of an organization.

At VA, we define our culture by an easy acronym, I CARE. Taken together, these words represent the five key values we find in our work: integrity, commitment, advocacy, respect and excellence. However, it's just as easy to look at it as a simple phrase, "I care," that begins any statement about our work.

  • I care about those who have served.
  • I care about my fellow VA employees.
  • I care about choosing "the harder right instead of the easier wrong."
  • I care about performing my duties to the best of my abilities.

So, how can you tell if a workplace is a good fit for your skills and abilities? Are there things you should be considering as you look for a new job? The following questions will help guide you to assess both yourself and VA.

Questions to ask yourself

  1. In what type of work environment are you most productive and happy?

    Assessing how you work is critical in knowing the type of employment you're looking for. If you want to be on your feet and moving around, an office job isn't for you. If you need a quiet space and time to focus, though, an office might be a good fit.

  2. What motivates you to do your best work?

    Whether it's a steady paycheck, the promise of a promotion, or a sense of gratitude from the people you work with, many factors can impact how well you do your job. Consider what really drives you and you can better assess if a workplace will give you what you need.

  3. How would past coworkers best describe your work style?

    Any good self-assessment includes looking at your performance from an outside perspective. Be honest with yourself and reflect on how you've interacted with others during your career. Recognizing how you work with others can help you assess the type of work culture you're best suited to.

There are many more possibilities to consider when assessing what you want from your new career, but the above questions should give you a good sense of where your interests lie.

Questions to ask at your VA interview

  1. What would I be doing on a typical day?

    A simple question, but an effective gauge of how your time will be spent while you're at work. This question can also help you judge whether or not your interviewer has a grasp of what the position entails, and what their response might indicate about the workplace culture.

  2. Why did my predecessor leave?

    If a vacancy has been created, it pays to know why. Perhaps the position is new, or perhaps the person before you moved on to bigger and better things, maybe even within VA itself. Getting an answer to this question can tell you a lot about the place where you'll be working.

  3. What is your favorite thing about working here?

    Give your interviewer a chance to sell you on VA even as you find out what motivates a potential coworker. With that information, you'll get a chance to take the pulse of VA and find out if it's a place you really want to work.

Again, there are many more questions you could ask of your interviewer, but these core inquiries will help you gain a better understanding of workplace expectations.

Work at VA

As the Veteran population rapidly grows more diverse, we're looking to recruit talent like you — someone with a strong understanding of our mission and who shares our commitment to helping Veterans.

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15 High Income Skills To Learn In 2022 (Without A Degree)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

These days there are a number of high income skills that can put you in a great position financially, but also give you a tremendous amount of flexibility in your life.

But which ones should you consider first?

This list of the most profitable skills to learn will point you in the right direction. No matter what your background is or what your preferences are, you'll surely find one below that appeals to you!

SEO

A strong Internet presence is a must in today's tech-focused world. Companies need to invest in their digital footprint, creating well-designed websites that can bring in more business. Whether a company is selling products directly to consumers or providing a service to B2B clients, ranking highly in search engines is incredibly important.

Most search engine users won't even take a peek at the second page when they look something up. Not only that, but the higher up you are on the first page will significantly increase the amount of visitors your website gets. That's where SEO comes in.

SEO stands for search engine optimization. Simply put, it's the act of fine-tuning content to cater to a search engine's algorithms (while still delivering a good user experience). Best practices for Google, Bing, and other popular search engines are constantly changing, so SEO is an ever-evolving and competitive field.

Understanding the intricacies of SEO can put you in a great place career-wise. Not only is this a high income skill that's in great demand, but knowing SEO opens up doors for working freelance or starting your own business.

Copywriting

You might not have heard of this skill before, but it's a vital part of marketing and advertising.

To put it simply, copywriting is a specialized form of writing. The goal is to inform potential customers and encourage them to take a specific action. That could be to fill out a form, make a purchase, or even just click on a link.

Whatever the case may be, copywriters must use their way with words to guide prospects in the right direction. The fact that good copywriting can have such a large impact on the bottom line of a business makes this a profitable and high income skill to learn.

There are many routes to take with copywriters. Some will work with marketing agencies, others prefer to freelance, while others will operate "in-house" within a single company's marketing or advertising department. Like SEO, copywriting comes with plenty of freedom to work on your terms and earn a high salary.

Software Development

Can you imagine a world without software developers? We rely so much on smartphones and computers to do everything. Developers work behind the scenes to make our digital lives possible!

Developers work diligently to create mobile apps, computer software, and more. Many will also participate in web development, creating front-end interfaces for external applications or internal databases.

Ever since the digital revolution, software development has been one of the most lucrative and high paying skills you can have. Every piece of software you've ever used in your life was brought to life by a dedicated developer. New apps come out all the time, and nearly every industry requires unique software to operate efficiently.

Being a software developer can take you very far. Working for a larger company, trying your hand at game development, or working on small-scale projects as a freelancer are just a few of the directions you can go. Knowing how to code will ensure that you're not only employed for the rest of your life, but you'll earn a great living as well!

Sales

Sales is another profitable skill that you can use pretty much anywhere. There's an element of sales in most industries. Whether it's B2B or B2C, there's plenty of money to make!

Some of the top earners can easily make six figures or more! Companies take care of their sales team, as they're responsible for generating revenue and taking care of the organization's bottom line. You may find opportunities to work for commissions, which gives you the chance to skyrocket your income potential if you're a high performer.

There's no shortage of motivation to work, and many successful salespeople thrive in the electric sales environment.

The beauty of this high income skill is that you don't need any special education. You can learn to be a successful salesperson regardless of your background. Plus, many types of sales positions are available to help you find your place within a team.

Project Management

Project managers use their abilities to communicate, stay organized, and lead a team. This high paying skill is slightly different from others, as it doesn't always require technical know-how (this depends on the industry). Degree programs exist for project management, but more and more companies are moving past formal education requirements in favor of talent and experience.

As a project manager, your job is to oversee an organization's daily operations to complete large-scale assignments. That's a pretty broad description, but that's because every industry needs project managers!

If you work for a retail company, you might oversee the production and launch of a new product. Maybe you're working in public infrastructure. In that case, you might manage the design and execution of a newly paved road!

The possibilities are endless, and you can end up working in a wide range of jobs. As long as you can keep a team on track and complete assignments efficiently, employers will want to work with you.

Web Design

Like we mentioned earlier, every company needs a well-designed website. There are almost two billion websites on the Internet, and that number will only grow as we head deeper into our new digital age!

Web design is one of those tasks that businesses need regardless of their industry. Some organizations will have an in-house team to cover web design needs throughout the year. Some will hire contractors or work with a third-party design company.

Either way, the demand is there!

This high income skill doesn't require a ton of in-depth coding knowledge. It's not like software engineering or back-end coding.

Designers either pass their creations along to developers, or work with website builders and content management systems like WordPress. The focus is on design and aesthetics, making it a viable choice for any creative-minded individual.

Real Estate

If you've ever been involved with buying or selling property, you know just how much money there is in the industry. But while the earning potential is high, it's a fiercely competitive field that requires in-depth knowledge of the current market.

If you're interested in building profitable skills in the real estate industry, there are a couple of approaches you can take.

As an agent, you can facilitate sales and earn commissions on your work. High-priced properties can make you a significant income. However, even selling many average-priced homes can give you the financial security you seek.

If you prefer a different approach, you can also become an investor. It requires upfront capital and knowledge on how to utilize a property, but the earning potential is high if you succeed. Investors can develop properties, generate rental income, and more.

Content Marketing

Many people confuse content marketing with copywriting. While both skills usually involve a love of writing, content marketing is about using various forms of content to support the growth objectives of a business.

In other words, the scope of content marketing is a bit broader. You may produce content to increase brand awareness, tell stories, educate, or inspire customers. Ultimately, the aim is to create compelling content that hooks readers and keeps them returning.

Content marketing is a high paying skill with ample flexibility and many possible routes to go. Many eventually work for themselves developing content for eager clients.

UX Design

UX stands for user experience and revolves around the front-end design of websites, apps, and other customer-facing platforms. What users see and how they navigate a website or app can make all the difference. A poor user experience is a huge turnoff for modern consumers.

As a result, companies are looking to fine-tune every minute detail to increase sales, revenue, and engagement. That's where a UX design professional comes in.

As a UX designer, you use qualitative and quantitative research to develop an enjoyable digital front-end experience. It's not just about design. UX involves navigation, emotional responses, overall user-friendliness, and much more.

Mastering UX design can do a lot to pad your resume. The skill is in high demand and shows no signs of slowing down.

Graphic Design

Graphic design is a marketable and high income skill that leads to many work opportunities. You can land a full-time career in advertising or work on your own through freelance endeavors. Whatever the case may be, everyone needs graphics to accompany their digital footprint.

Graphic design is a creative pursuit that does require work to improve at. It's not like web design, where you can start with templates and pre-made elements. Many graphic designers create their work from scratch to convey a message or establish a theme.

There's no shortage of projects to tackle. As a graphic designer, you may find yourself creating a logo one day and drawing up infographics the next.

Video Editing

Video editing wasn't always a high income skill. A couple of decades ago, it was something you didn't need to know unless you worked in media arts. However, things are a lot different today.

Companies don't need to hire third-party media companies to create video content! Everything is more accessible than ever. As a result, more brands are developing video content for advertising and social media.

Social networks view video pretty favorably, making it a quick and easy way to garner attention for products or services. Putting together well-made videos for Instagram or YouTube is cost-efficient and has a significant marketing impact.

Video editing skills are in high demand these days. Because it's so new, there are not many requirements for education. Anyone can learn to use popular software, and those with creative backgrounds tend to excel on the artistic side of editing.

It's a versatile skill with opportunities in many industries!

Data Science

If you enjoy sifting through data to find patterns and solutions to problems, this is a skill you should hone.

Many of the high income skills you'll hear about are focused on some form of marketing and advertising. That's not necessarily the case with data science (at least directly). Data science is an analytical skill that revolves around problem-solving and efficiency.

From communications providers to machine learning engineering companies, they all need to analyze data. Companies have access to more data than ever, but making sense of it can be quite a challenge. Data science skills let you work proficiently to find solutions to complex problems, identify trends, and more. Your insights and analysis will help a company improve their processes and understand what they need to do in order to thrive.

The work you can do with this skill varies widely. However, all projects are analytical by nature and require proficiency in statistics, data visualization, mathematics, and code.

Trades

In high school, you likely didn't hear many advisors talking about the merits of honing trade skills rather than focusing on broad academic degree programs. But times are changing. Vocational degrees and certificate programs are becoming more popular because they focus on practical high income skills rather than general knowledge.

Trade skills can take you far, and there are many different kinds of skills to learn. Some of the most reliable trade professions are electricians, plumbers, mechanics, and HVAC installers. Society is always going to need people with those trade skills.

While underappreciated by some, those trade professionals keep modern society going. Every home and commercial property needs an electrician and a plumber!

Other trade skills are available to learn, too. Any skill that prepares you for a specific job can be considered a trade skill. That means everything from elevator mechanics to instrument repair applies.

Not every tradesperson will earn a high income right off the bat, but as you become more proficient your earning potential will grow significantly.

Social Media Marketing

There's no denying that social media reigns supreme in today's market. Gone are the days of platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram being nothing more than time-wasters. These days, those platforms are money-making machines!

More than half of the world's population is active on at least one social media platform. It's easier than ever to reach a broad audience.

Who would have known that being good at social media could get you so far? Ask any successful influencer, and they'll tell you that there are plenty of opportunities to grasp in the social media sphere.

Businesses often hire dedicated social media managers to handle these accounts, with many offering very high pay. Responsibilities include creating posts that stay true to the brand, interacting with consumers, networking, and more. It's a taller order than most realize.

Because social media managers represent the company as a whole, they take great care in choosing the most qualified person they can. If you have the necessary skills it can be quite profitable!

Paid Advertising

Paid advertising is a unique skill sought after by retail companies and businesses looking to advertise their products or services. This high income skill often involves a specific advertising channel called PPC, or pay-per-click.

With this advertising model, businesses pay a fee each time Internet users click on an ad. It can be a successful form of marketing that provides a more direct connection than alternatives like SEO, and it requires great skill to do well.

Businesses often hire PPC specialists who can design and execute campaigns successfully. The job involves many subsets, including copywriting, graphic design, and conversion optimization. When all the pieces fall into place, you have a captivating advertisement that attracts attention and encourages action.

There's also an art to managing campaigns to get the most bang for your buck, because you need to run ads that convert (or else the company loses money). Understanding the complexities of paid advertising can make your resume stand out. It also opens up doors for freelance work or starting your own paid advertising business.

The Value of Learning High Income Skills

High income skills are in demand, offering excellent job security and a positive outlook for the future. Not only that, but these skills come with better pay and plenty of room to grow as your abilities improve.

But that's not all.

The most profitable skills you can learn offer long-term flexibility. You can start your career utilizing these skills to work as an employee for a company, but you'll also have the ability to branch out and do your own thing if you want!

Start your own business, do freelance work, or become an independent contractor. The choice is yours. As long as you continue to improve your skills, the ball is in your court.

Be Patient

One of the most important things to remember when learning any high income skill is that hard work and dedication still apply! These skills can be quite profitable and help you secure your financial future, but it's not going to happen overnight. These aren't "hacks" or "get rich quick" schemes.

It takes time to master these skills, and you'll invest years into them. The good news is that high income skills pay more the better you become. But even after you get to a point where you're making the big bucks, keeping your abilities current is a lifelong process.

Nothing in life comes for free. These skills can do a lot to give you the financial freedom you desire, but you have to work to get there!

Conclusion

Now that you know the best high income skills to learn, it's time for you to pick your favorites. Everyone gravitates toward certain jobs more than others, and it's no different with the list above.

If you're creative, maybe consider learning graphic design. If you're a strong writer, copywriting could be your calling. If you're highly analytical, learn data science!

No matter what you settle on, the skills in this list can be highly profitable. Stick with it, get better, and being paid well will be the last of your worries.

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Veteran earns six figures, advances his career with Salesforce Military

By Dr. Tracy L. Weistreich | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

During a lunch break — of 20 minutes — Willie Wright not only completed a training through Salesforce Military but also discovered a learning opportunity that could actively apply to his current work.

"This program has been life-changing for me and I'm happy to help anyone that's willing to take part in this journey," Wright said. "Salesforce Military has changed a lot of Veterans' lives and if nothing else, helped them get into a career that might have otherwise been unavailable."

Wright started his journey with Salesforce Military in October 2019 and by March the following year, he was in a new role earning more than $100,000 annually. The Trailhead Military program provides active military, Veterans, and respective spouses free training, exams, certifications, and career opportunities for high-paying tech jobs.

"All you have to do is make the time commitment and even the time commitment is reasonable if you do of couple hours a week," he said. "Within a few months, you can be certified and have a new job."

Salesforce Military and the Veterans Health Administration have partnered to help Veterans learn more about the benefits and services they may be eligible for and to help connect Veterans to skill development, career advancement, and employment resources.

Helped over 1000 Veterans, Service Members and spouses enroll

Together, VA and Salesforce Military collaborate to help Veterans across multiple social determinants of health (SDOH) during their transition from the military. Since June 2021, VHA has helped more than 1,000 Veterans, service members, and their spouses enroll in Salesforce Military.

Through the partnership, VHA and Salesforce Military developed the VA Benefits for Veterans training module, which identifies VA resources for Veterans across SDOH, such as economic stability, employment and health literacy. The module, which has been accessed by more than 2,000 people, provides an overview of VA benefits and how to access them.

Since its launch in 2014, 40,000 service members, Veterans, and spouses have joined Salesforce Military. The training and certification program helped place more than 1,200 members into high-paying tech jobs. The ecosystem also provides a network of individuals willing to help each other with work questions, job referrals, and more.

"It's almost akin to when you're in the military, get out, you meet other Veterans, and you automatically have something that you're connected over. You can kind of build a bond over it and have instant friendships based upon just the love of this one software platform."

15 to 20 years ahead of salary plans

Through the Salesforce Talent Alliance, a program that connects employers to Salesforce candidates with certifications, Wright met and interviewed for his current company. Prior to using Salesforce Military, he anticipated reaching his current salary range in 15 to 20 years.

But Wright credits the trainings — and leveraging his leadership practices from the military — as the reasoning behind how he achieved a better career and higher salary sooner.

"You're taking a chance on yourself. And much like our military community, you have this large community there to help you, mentor you, and guide you along your career," he said. "Salesforce is doing great things, trying to help Veterans get into that next stage of their life. All you have to do is be willing to make that jump."

The partnership between VA and Salesforce Military is managed by the National Center for Healthcare Advancement and Partnerships (HAP). HAP supports partnerships and emerging health innovations for Veterans, caregivers, and their families. Learn more about HAP at va.gov/healthpartnerships.

Read more about Salesforce Military at veterans.force.com.

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