How Long Does It Take To Hear Back From A Job?

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

How Long Does it Take to Hear Back from a Job? On average, it takes hiring managers one to two weeks to reach out to potential hirees after receiving an application. However, that's not always the case. Ultimately, the timeline you can expect depends entirely on the company you're trying to work for. You have to remember that employers will receive an onslaught of applications after publishing a job post. Depending on the position and location, they could have hundreds or thousands of resumes to sift through. It's a reasonable expectation to give companies a couple of weeks to do their due diligence. Of course, there are instances when things will move quickly (or very slowly). It all depends on a number of factors....... Read more

Find your next job with help from an American Corporate Partners mentor

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

National nonprofit American Corporate Partners (ACP) works with post-9/11 Veterans to help them find meaningful employment after military service. Whether Veterans are looking for a higher paying job or seeking a promotion, an ACP Mentor can help guide them toward positive employment outcomes. The program helps Veterans find great jobs — and the right jobs for them. All industries and career paths are represented and Veterans can explore career opportunities, learn about job search tips and tricks, gain resume and interviewing skills, and get connected directly to employers who are hiring. Since 2010, more than 22,000 Veterans have already found success through ACP. In addition to facilitating thousands of nationwide mentorships, ACP staff works hard to connect Veterans to meaningful employment opportunities at its partner companies... Read more

How To Politely Decline A Job Interview

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Learning how to decline a job interview is something that everyone needs to do eventually. If you work long enough, there's a good chance you'll be put in this situation! Fortunately, it doesn't have to be an awkward experience. In fact, you can actually leave a great impression while turning down the interview. This guide will teach you how. Reasons to Turn Down a Job Interview. While getting the opportunity to go in for an interview is usually a moment worth celebrating, there are many reasons why you might want to decline. A lot can happen between submitting an application and getting a callback. Here are some potential reasons to turn down an interview...... Read more

Found in translation: Tips for removing military jargon from your resume

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

Whether you are a Veteran who has served for four years or 40, your time in the military will have taught you many things, not the least of which is a lot of jargon. The acronyms and lingo you learn in the military quickly become second nature. Unfortunately, not everyone speaks this language. But there are tips and resources available to help translate what you know into something that makes more sense in the civilian job market. Lose the lingo. When it comes time to convert what you learned in the military to civilian life, you might find yourself grasping for the words to translate the shorthand you used in your daily work in the service. That can make it hard to explain what your job duties were in the military, especially when you're dealing with civilian recruiters. "Steer away from acronyms," offered Kendra Wilson-Hudson... Read more

C-11-22 Political Rewind Producer - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
Administrative Assistant - Park Lawn Corporation - - - TN
NAVWAR Systems Engineer - ENSCO Inc. - Los Angeles - CA
Social Media Manager - Chenega Analytic Business Solutions, LLC - Fort Eustis - VA
Gentle Relocation Managers & Assistants for Seniors - Gentle Transitions of California - Fresno - CA
  • A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service

Complete list of Partners

FREE U.S. Veterans Magazine Subscription for TAOnline Members!

U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) Is the premiere resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation's veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America, and the federal government.
Subscribe for FREE today!

How Long Does It Take To Hear Back From A Job?

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

How Long Does it Take to Hear Back from a Job?

On average, it takes hiring managers one to two weeks to reach out to potential hirees after receiving an application. However, that's not always the case. Ultimately, the timeline you can expect depends entirely on the company you're trying to work for.

You have to remember that employers will receive an onslaught of applications after publishing a job post. Depending on the position and location, they could have hundreds or thousands of resumes to sift through. It's a reasonable expectation to give companies a couple of weeks to do their due diligence.

Of course, there are instances when things will move quickly (or very slowly). It all depends on a number of factors.

Why You Might Hear Back Quickly

In some cases, hiring managers will reach out much sooner. Usually, that happens when the position in question is pivotal to business operations (but isn't too senior). Maybe the previous employee left the company without much notice, leaving the organization scrambling and losing money.

When that happens, hiring managers tend to work fast to find suitable candidates and move the hiring process forward. In this scenario, it's not uncommon to hear back within a few days at most!

If you're fortunate, you might hear back earlier than two weeks because your application stood out. Employers can hasten the hiring process if they feel you're a good fit. Consider yourself lucky in those moments!

It's important to note that some companies will begin reviewing resumes immediately. There has been some research that found applying early in the process can help you get noticed. Whenever possible, apply sooner rather than later.

Why You Might Have To Wait A While

On the other hand, sometimes it can take a lot longer than two weeks to hear back from a job. It's rare, but it's not unheard of for companies to wait a month before contacting an applicant with good news. Some government jobs are known to take upwards of eight weeks before finally reaching out to potential hirees!

From an outside standpoint, waiting that long isn't a smart choice for hiring managers. But in many cases, it's out of their hands.

Things can change internally during the job search. The parameters of the hiring process could evolve, and companies can decide to go with an inside promotion or change what they're looking for halfway through the search.

The timing could be an issue as well. For example, the organization could be short-staffed due to vacations, or maybe they're setting a new budget and have to wait until things go through before proceeding. Whatever the case may be, those rare timelines do occur.

Generally, it's best to wait at least two weeks to hear back from a job before considering the possibility that you didn't get the job. There's still a chance that employers could reach out after the two-week point, and this is why it's so important to reach out or follow up after two weeks.

Another vital point to remember is that the countdown should start after the posting's closing date. You may or may not see this information in the job posting. The closing date is the last day the employer will accept applications.

Some hiring managers won't even start looking for suitable candidates until after that closing day. So, your two-week countdown can begin there for good measure.

If you don't see a closing date, you can start the two-week timeline whenever you confirm the company got your application and resume. Many large applications use an applicant tracking system that screens applications. The software typically sends an automated email when everything has been received.

If you don't receive an automated response that your application was received, it's important to take some of the steps below.

What to Do While Waiting for Them to Respond

Wondering how long it's going to take to hear back about a job application is one of the most stress-inducing parts of the job search. It can feel like a lifetime of waiting to know your fate!

Instead of letting yourself get worked up sitting by the phone or refreshing your email, there are more productive ways to use your time.

Here are some things you can do while you wait for a response.

Ask Someone Who Works Inside the Company

Know someone who already works at the organization you applied to? Reach out to them for some internal insight.

As we mentioned earlier, many factors can delay the hiring process. If any internal changes prevent the hiring managers from proceeding with the search, your inside connection might know about it. They can give you a heads up, hopefully easing your worries and giving you enough information to adjust your timeline.

While you're in contact with someone who works inside the company, see if they can help you network. Not everyone is willing to connect you to the right people, but if this insider is someone you're close to, they can get you in touch with all the right people.

Effective networking can give you a leg up in any industry. The right connections go a long way, so you should always jump at any opportunity to expand your professional network. Having someone inside is like already having a toe in the door!

Ask Someone Who Recently Applied

Other potential applicants might also provide some insight into what's going on with the hiring process.

Ask around to see if you know anyone who's applied for a similar position. If it's a well-known business with an opening specific to your industry or trade, there's a good chance that some people in your networking circle applied, too. Industries are pretty tight-knit, and everyone is connected in some way.

Again, this is where the importance of networking comes in!

Once you find someone, reach out and see if they've heard anything. Their response can give you some valuable insight into the hiring process and how long you should expect to wait before hearing back.

If you both applied at the same time and the company has already reached out to them, you know that your chances of getting a response aren't great. The hiring managers have clearly begun setting up interviews, and the process is moving forward. While it's disappointing, at least you know. Now you can stop worrying and move on to other potential job openings.

But let's say that your colleague didn't hear back. That could mean that you're still in the running. It might indicate delays and hiring managers haven't reached out to anyone yet. Of course, that's all conjecture, but it's better than not knowing anything at all.

Even if your colleague is just as anxious as you are, they could have some insight that you don't. Maybe they have an inside acquaintance, too. Sharing that information can provide peace of mind across the board.

Be Ready to Follow Up After Two Weeks

As you wait to hear back from a job, it's always a good idea to prepare for your follow-up correspondence. If you have the hiring manager's email address, follow-ups are a great way to express interest and see where you stand in the hiring process.

Whether or not you choose to do this is up to you. Some people don't follow up with companies unless it's a position they truly want and feel they're qualified to have. Others send them out with every application!

Generally, the best practice is to reserve follow-up contact for your top-choice jobs.

One crucial thing to remember is that you should always wait two weeks before calling or emailing the employer. Two weeks is the average timeline for hiring managers to reach out. When in doubt, reread the job posting and email confirming receipt of your application and see if a time frame was provided. If nothing was mentioned about when to follow up, you'll probably want to wait the full two weeks.

You can craft the email early, just don't hit the "send" button!

When it comes to how you follow up, simple is best! Keep the email short and sweet. State who you are, what position you applied for, and briefly mention why you feel you're qualified.

The goal here is to express interest. If the hiring manager is looking through applications, your follow-up email could help you stand out. It shows your dedication, which might give you a slight advantage.

Keep Looking and Applying

Here's the most important tip we can give: Don't stop your job search!

Don't leave your fate in the hands of a single employer. Even if that job is your dream position and there are early signs you got the job, continuing your job search is paramount. You don't want to put all of your eggs in one basket. It's far too risky and could end up harming you in the long run.

Keep looking and applying while you wait to hear back about the job application. Not only does that improve your prospects for gaining employment, but it'll help you keep your mind off the wait. The best thing you can do is stay busy looking for new opportunities.

Who knows? You may end up finding a job that's even better.

Keep your options open and see what's out there. It's also a good idea to keep track of what companies you've applied for during your search. That way, you don't mix up names and positions should you get the response you want.

Manage Your Stress

Last but certainly not least, don't neglect your self-care.

There's no denying that job searches are stressful. They can be a rollercoaster of emotions. One second you feel excited and eager to apply. But several weeks later, you might start to feel down and out because you didn't hear back from an employer.

Those emotions are perfectly reasonable. It's alright to be disappointed about not getting a job. Take a moment to let your feelings out and experience that sadness.

But after that? Move on.

Don't dwell on missed opportunities because there's always something else on the horizon. Focus on your mental well-being and take steps to manage your stress levels.

While you're waiting to hear back from a job, spend time with family and friends. Put some time into your hobbies and indulge in activities that bring you peace! Don't be afraid to take a mental health day every once in a while.

Applying for open positions can feel like a full-time job full of nothing but stress and disappointment. Take a day off to unwind and reset. You'll thank yourself for it later!

Are There Ways You Can Speed Up the Response Time?

Now that you know how long it takes to hear back from a job, it's only natural to wonder if you can speed things up. Luckily, there are a few things that might make the process go by a little quicker. There are no guarantees, but certain application techniques are known to leave a lasting impression on hiring managers.

The first thing you can do is limit applications to positions with requirements that closely match your qualifications. There's nothing wrong with applying for jobs if you only meet some requirements. Many employers are open to training new hires if they're a good fit.

But if you match qualifications to a tee, your application will instantly stand out. Limiting your applications to those jobs can reduce that dreaded wait time!

Another thing you can do to make your application more appealing is to make sure you have researched salaries and know the range you are asking for is in line with the jobs you are applying to. Always know your worth! Most applications will ask for a numeric salary requirement — either a single number or a range.

However, some hiring managers won't consider applicants if the expected salary exceeds a certain threshold. If your range is close, be ready to say you're open to negotiations when you get called for the screening interview. If the hiring managers feel that you're a fantastic fit, you can negotiate and get to where you want to be. Employers are more likely to consider salaries outside their initial range once they see your qualifications and meet you in person.

Finally, you can craft your resume with both the hiring manager and the applicant tracking system in mind. As mentioned earlier, many larger businesses use software to sift through applications and find the ones that fit the position closest. Use that technology to your advantage.

As you craft your resume, implement keywords from the job post. Make adjustments so that your resume looks tailor-made for that position.

Never lie or exaggerate.

A tailored resume has a better chance of appealing to the hiring manager or recruiter, plus it is likely to stand out in the applicant tracking system.

Conclusion

While it's normal to wonder how long it takes to hear back about a job, don't let the wait consume you!

Instead, take the recommended steps to be proactive and improve your odds while you wait. You'll be happy you did.

Back

Find your next job with help from an American Corporate Partners mentor

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

National nonprofit American Corporate Partners (ACP) works with post-9/11 Veterans to help them find meaningful employment after military service. Whether Veterans are looking for a higher paying job or seeking a promotion, an ACP Mentor can help guide them toward positive employment outcomes. The program helps Veterans find great jobs — and the right jobs for them.

All industries and career paths are represented and Veterans can explore career opportunities, learn about job search tips and tricks, gain resume and interviewing skills, and get connected directly to employers who are hiring. Since 2010, more than 22,000 Veterans have already found success through ACP.

In addition to facilitating thousands of nationwide mentorships, ACP staff works hard to connect Veterans to meaningful employment opportunities at its partner companies. Veterans who become part of the ACP network also enjoy other benefits, such as:

  • A free online question and answer community, ACP AdvisorNet, to get quick career advice and search job postings.
  • Wednesday Webinars with partner companies and hiring managers.
Get Paired with a Mentor

Getting started with ACP is easy:

Visit acp-usa.org and fill out a brief application. Answer questions that include background, interests, military experience and mentoring preferences.

What to Expect after Applying?

ACP will reach out within 24 hours and schedule a 15-minute phone call to ask a few more clarifying questions in order to match the Veteran with the right mentor. ACP will introduce the Veteran to a mentor within several weeks of their application to the program, and will check in throughout the year to provide customized resources and ensure positive outcomes. Ninety-eight percent of Veterans would recommend ACP.

All post-9/11 Veterans who have served at least 180 days of active duty since 9/11 are eligible.

APPLY HERE (acp-usa.org)

* The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Verify information with the organization offering.

Back

How To Politely Decline A Job Interview

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Learning how to decline a job interview is something that everyone needs to do eventually. If you work long enough, there's a good chance you'll be put in this situation!

Fortunately, it doesn't have to be an awkward experience. In fact, you can actually leave a great impression while turning down the interview.

This guide will teach you how.

Reasons to Turn Down a Job Interview

While getting the opportunity to go in for an interview is usually a moment worth celebrating, there are many reasons why you might want to decline. A lot can happen between submitting an application and getting a callback.

Here are some potential reasons to turn down an interview.

Your Plans Changed

Changes occur all the time, and they often happen whenever you're in a transitory period of your life. Maybe you applied to a job in a new city with plans of relocating. Things can happen to make you rethink that decision.

For example, you might decide to stay closer to family. Or maybe you choose to go back to school to improve your job prospects. If you're lucky, your current job may have offered you a promotion.

Whatever the case may be, a sudden change in plans is always a valid reason for declining an interview.

You've Lost Interest

It's perfectly reasonable to lose interest in a job. You can learn things about the company later on that you didn't know when you applied. It's not uncommon for applicants to lose interest in the company's operations or way of doing business.

In some cases, applicants realize that they're not interested after going in for an initial interview. Maybe you got an invitation to a second or third round. If you don't feel like you'd be happy working there, because you don't like the way they do business or you discover you'll have to be on call 24/7 — decline the next interview.

There's nothing wrong with that, and declining the interview saves time for everyone involved.

It's Not a Good Fit

Sometimes, you realize that the position isn't good for you. You might discover more about the job and recognize the responsibilities aren't what you want.

Alternatively, you might feel that the work culture or the organization's vision isn't suitable for you (this can sometimes come up when you've asked questions at the end of an interview). Some people also find job opportunities they're better suited for after applying for a handful of jobs.

Whatever the case may be, it's better to realize that the job isn't right for you now than to come to that conclusion later. Declining early and stopping the hiring process now would be beneficial in this case.

You Already Accepted a Job Elsewhere

There's a good chance that you applied to several different companies during your search. While it's always good to consider all of your options, you might get an offer that's perfect for you. If that's the case, declining the interview will save you time and help you focus on your new position.

You've Gotten New Information About the Company

Finally, you might want to decline an interview after learning more about a company. Researching a company is crucial before heading into an interview. During that process, you could learn things you don't like.

For example, you might see that the company is suffering financial losses. In that case, working there could be risky. Or maybe you learned more about the company background and saw many red flags you didn't like.

Don't ignore your gut instinct. If you don't want to be a part of the company, now is the time to halt the process.

How to Politely Decline an Interview

Figuring out how to decline a job interview isn't easy. While it's tempting to ignore the offer and not respond to the hiring manager or recruiter, it's best to respond and decline. The last thing you want to do is burn bridges. Word travels fast, and you could potentially give yourself a bad reputation in your industry.

That said, you must give your response careful thought. Declining an interview can come off as disrespectful and ungrateful. You want to be polite and respectful by choosing your words wisely.

Consider Your Options

First things first, make sure declining the offer is something you want to do. Weigh over your options and remember that an interview is precisely that: an interview. It's not a job offer, and you're not making any commitments to work at the organization by showing up.

If there's any inkling of doubt over your decision to decline the job interview, consider accepting it. You learn a lot about an organization during the interview. That experience will either cement your initial decision or clear up some worries.

In that case, going to the interview could be beneficial to you.

Whatever you do, don't let fear or anxiety keep you from an opportunity. You might feel tempted to back out because it's your first major interview, or it could be a chance to work at a prestigious organization. Don't let a bit of fear force you into making a decision you'll regret later.

Reflect on this choice and make sure that it's the right one for you before you officially turn down the interview.

Respond Soon, But Not Too Quickly

Here's where thinking about your decision a little more comes in handy. You want to respond promptly, but you don't want to send back an immediate no (or else they might wonder why you bothered applying in the first place).

There's a delicate balance here. Give it a day to mull over the decision. But after that, you must respond. Generally, anything more than a day or so comes off as you wasting time.

Remember: The hiring manager is trying to do their job and fill a vacant position. The longer you wait to decline, the worse you come off! Be respectful of their time and decline the offer promptly so that they can move on to the next candidate.

Be Polite and Thankful

Once you're ready to decline the job interview, keep this in your mind: Don't burn bridges!

It doesn't matter if your research gave you a million red flags and you would never consider working there. Most industries are smaller than you might think. Failing to be polite might come back to bite you later. Plus, you never know if you'll want to work there in the future.

As a good rule of thumb, always be respectful and thank them for the opportunity. Lead with kindness and gratitude. Keep things professional and do everything you can to maintain a positive working relationship.

Read over your messages multiple times and consider how your words can come off before hitting that "Send" button.

Don't Dive Too Deep Into the Details

Don't feel like you need to provide a multi-page essay about why you decided to turn down the interview. Your reply should be short and to the point. Most importantly, your reasoning should also be a bit vague.

You want to communicate that you're declining the interview and not much more. Why? Because it's a bit tricky to explain yourself without potentially coming off as inconsiderate.

Even if that's not your intention, there's always the chance that your words will get misinterpreted. It's best to keep it vague and avoid disrespecting the company or hiring manager.

If your reasoning is a change of plans or accepting a job elsewhere, you can briefly mention that if pressed. But there isn't much to be gained by providing a whole lot of details.

If Possible, Recommend Another Person

What if you've worked out how to decline a job interview but know someone who would fit the role you were applying for? Mention them! Of course, make sure it's alright with the person in question before you do this.

Referring another suitable candidate to the hiring manager or recruiter shows that you don't have ill intentions in declining the interview. It's a great way to show your respect and help the company out a bit.

Sample Emails for Declining a Job Interview

Follow those tips above, and you should have no problem crafting a respectful and courteous email. But here are some samples that will help teach you how to turn down a job interview while still being polite.

Sample #1: Short and Sweet

Subject: Invitation to Interview for [Position] at [Organization]

Hello [Name of Recruiter],

Thank you for considering me for [Position] and inviting me to interview for [Organization]. However, I have to decline the opportunity at this time.

I sincerely appreciate your time and consideration.

Best Regards,

[Your Name]
[Email]
[Phone Number]
[LinkedIn URL]

Sample #2: Recommending Another Candidate

Subject: Interview Invitation for [Position] at [Organization]

Dear [Name of Recruiter],

Thank you so much for taking the time to review my application and reach out. Since I initially applied for [Position] at [Organization], I received and accepted a job at another company, so I respectfully decline your interview offer.

If you need recommendations, I have a colleague I believe would be a fantastic fit for [Organization]. Let me know, and I'd be happy to pass along their information.

Best of luck, and I hope that we have another chance to work together in the future when the timing is right.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]
[Email]
[Phone Number]
[LinkedIn URL]

Conclusion

Now that you know how to politely decline a job interview, this situation shouldn't seem intimidating or awkward. This is a common occurrence, and any hiring manager will understand as long as you're respectful.

Back

Found in translation: Tips for removing military jargon from your resume

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2022, Reprinted with permission

Whether you are a Veteran who has served for four years or 40, your time in the military will have taught you many things, not the least of which is a lot of jargon. The acronyms and lingo you learn in the military quickly become second nature.

Unfortunately, not everyone speaks this language. But there are tips and resources available to help translate what you know into something that makes more sense in the civilian job market.

Lose the lingo

When it comes time to convert what you learned in the military to civilian life, you might find yourself grasping for the words to translate the shorthand you used in your daily work in the service. That can make it hard to explain what your job duties were in the military, especially when you're dealing with civilian recruiters.

"Steer away from acronyms," offered Kendra Wilson-Hudson, a physician recruitment consultant with the VA National Recruitment Service, during a recent "Talk About It Tuesday" broadcast. "The people who are reviewing your resume may not have served. They may be civilians, and they won't know what those acronyms mean."

As a best practice, Wilson-Hudson recommended spelling out what you're trying to say and shortening it with the acronym in parentheses after.

Tools of the trade

Another place where you might get tripped up on your resume is explaining the duties of your military profession. Like a civilian, you become so used to just doing the work that you may not know how to best explain it to others. As a Veteran, you have the added challenge of translating your expertise in terms a civilian can understand.

Thankfully, there are tools to help polish your resume, including military skills translators that allow you to input your military occupational specialty (MOS) — remember what we said above about using acronyms? — or your service equivalent career. In return, you'll get a civilian description of your skills.

Perhaps you were an 0111 Administrative Specialist in the U.S. Marine Corps. You and your peers already know what the job involves, but a civilian might not know you tackled accounts payable processes, auditing, customer service, data entry, typing, payroll and more.

Some other examples of translating military professions to civilian skills:

  • 92Y Unit Supply Specialist, U.S. Army — Cargo handling, firearms handling and maintenance, inventory management and distribution, logistics support and loss prevention techniques
  • 92G Culinary Specialist, U.S. Army — Beverage preparation, food and beverage services, food preparation and presentation, food safety procedures, inventory management and menu development
  • 1169 Utilities Chief, U.S. Marine Corps — Advanced first aid, blueprints and technical diagrams, industrial control systems, industrial equipment operation, logistics support, project management, safety and occupational health programs, skills with hand tools and power tools, and technical writing

USAJobs has its own resume building tool that helps fill some of these gaps, as well as a helpful list of hints and tips to help you provide what the job announcement is seeking.

Go with what you know

When in doubt, take the time to describe not just the duties related to your job, but what you did in that role specifically.

Explain how you approached your job and the duties you assumed each day. Doing so will help you stand out as a candidate, especially to a civilian recruiter.

"When you start to talk about the duties and responsibilities that you held in your job, talk about it from your perspective, what you did, so that way the person knows that you know what you're doing," Wilson-Hudson encouraged. "Talk about the different steps it took to get to an outcome in a position. You have to take the time to sell yourself."

Work at VA

If you're looking to make the jump from your military career to a civilian one, taking the time to translate your skills and abilities will help you showcase yourself as a qualified candidate.

Back