"What's Most Important To You In Your Next Position?" Answers

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"What is most important to you in your next position?" is an interview question that comes up all the time, but many applicants aren't prepared for it. This guide will help you structure an answer that will leave a great impression, and improve your chance of getting the job. Why Interviewers Ask "What is Most Important to You in Your Next Position?" Interviewers often ask open-ended questions that do more than highlight your qualifications and skills. "What is most important to you in your next position?" is a fine example of this. It's meant to go deeper into what makes you a suitable candidate, giving you a chance to tell interviewers why you should get the job and how you would fit into the role. Sometimes it might be asked as "... Read more

Seeking Veterans for the midterm elections

By news.VA.gov | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

As political candidates jockey for support during the stretch run to the U.S. midterm elections on November 8, state and local officials are scrambling to staff polling sites with election volunteers. Major indicators are projecting a massive poll worker shortage for the 2022 midterms and beyond. Aware of this potential crisis, the Vet the Vote campaign is seeking to recruit 100,000 Veterans and military family members to be poll workers in the 2022 midterms and other future elections. Vet the Vote is a coalition of 26 Veteran and military service organizations and four civic groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Football League (NFL). More than 1 million volunteers are needed to run national elections. If only 10% of the 17 million... Read more

How To Ask For Feedback After A Job Rejection (Properly)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing how to ask for feedback after a job rejection can benefit your career in a number of ways. While it's never ideal to get passed on for a job you want, it's realistic to assume that it will likely happen to you at some point. This guide will teach you how to ask for feedback after a job rejection and provide you with some sample emails to make the process easier. How to Ask for Feedback After a Job Rejection. Getting rejected for a job can be tough. That's especially true if it was a job you were genuinely interested in and went through several rounds of interviews. While you can do everything in your power to prepare, rejections happen. The best way to handle those moments is to ask for feedback. Understanding why hiring managers passed... Read more

What you need to know about VA benefits in the aftermath of Hurricanes Fiona and Ian

By news.VA.gov | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

Recent hurricanes have caused incredible destruction, leaving millions to grapple with the devastating impact and loss of life. Veterans and their families in regions affected by hurricanes Fiona and Ian can access VA resources and benefits to get the support they need after a natural disaster. One of the first places you can visit to receive help and resources is your state's VA Regional Benefits Office. You can look up your office's hours of operation, services and location at our facilities locator webpage. Additional resources in the wake of a disaster. Veterans Crisis Line. If you are in a crisis—or are concerned about someone else in crisis—get free, confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Veterans Crisis Line is available by phone, text or chat... Read more

Database Manager - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
Administrative Assistant - Park Lawn Corporation - NM
Fire Alarm & Suppression Technician Level II - CertaSite - Dayton - OH
Sales Financial Analyst - Performance Health - Warrenville - IL
C-11-24 Eduation Outreach Specialist (PT 2Yr Time Limited) - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
  • LinkedIn Mastery for Veterans and Transitioning Service Members

Complete list of Partners

Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair

July 25, 2024 - Online 11 AM - 2 PM EST

This Corporate Gray Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair provides military-experienced job seekers the opportunity to interview with employers nationwide via text chat and video. The event is for transitioning service members, veterans, and military spouses. Most participating employers require U.S. citizenship and cleared (or clearable) candidates for many positions. Job seekers are required to pre-register and upload their resume to participate in the event. Registered candidates will receive a Virtual Job Fair Training Guide and the Job Fair Employer Directory prior to the Virtual Job Fair. For more information: CorporateGray.com/jobfairs/492

FREE U.S. Veterans Magazine Subscription for TAOnline Members!

U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) Is the premiere resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation's veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America, and the federal government.
Subscribe for FREE today!

"What's Most Important To You In Your Next Position?" Answers

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"What is most important to you in your next position?" is an interview question that comes up all the time, but many applicants aren't prepared for it.

This guide will help you structure an answer that will leave a great impression, and improve your chance of getting the job.

Why Interviewers Ask "What is Most Important to You in Your Next Position?"

Interviewers often ask open-ended questions that do more than highlight your qualifications and skills. "What is most important to you in your next position?" is a fine example of this.

It's meant to go deeper into what makes you a suitable candidate, giving you a chance to tell interviewers why you should get the job and how you would fit into the role. Sometimes it might be asked as "Describe the three things that are most important for you in your next position" instead, but your approach when answering it will be the same.

There are several reasons why this particular question comes up.

Alignment With The Company Mission

First and foremost, it's to gauge whether or not your goals and interests align with the company's mission.

While most individuals can adapt to new jobs, regardless of whether it fits into their "big picture," companies want people who are passionate about what they're doing. They want employees who genuinely care about the position.

Why is this?

Passionate people are naturally motivated! If this position checks off all the boxes of what you want out of your next career move, you're more likely to have intrinsic motivation. Doing a good job is about more than getting your paycheck. It's something that makes you feel accomplished and satisfied.

That's the type of thing hiring managers want to see, and they're most likely to get it out of applicants that want to be there. Plus, it ensures that your time with the company is more than just a stepping stone.

Hiring managers don't expect you to stay at the job forever, but they prefer to hire folks who will stick around and grow with the company. Hiring new people is a costly endeavor. That's why so many organizations focus on boosting retention rates and reducing employee turnover.

Asking "What is most important to you in your next position?" is an open invitation to discuss your goals and ambitions. If those ambitions align with what the position offers, they'll believe that you're more likely to be in it for the long haul!

Gauge Culture Fit

This question can also help interviewers see if you're a good fit for the company's established culture and work environment. Every organization does things differently. Some are more focused on individualized contributions, while others prioritize teamwork and open communication.

You'll reveal many of your work preferences by describing what's important to you in a job. For example, you might say that having the opportunity to participate in large projects is what's most pivotal for you at this stage in your career. That indicates that you want a collaborative environment with tons of dynamic work.

Again, this goes back to ensuring that your goals align with the company. If you enjoy the culture and day-to-day operations, you're more likely to be satisfied and motivated in your job. This can be asked at the beginning of the hiring process, or even brought up as a final interview question.

How to Answer This Question

"What is most important to you in your next position?" might seem innocuous at face value, but it holds more weight than you think! Like other personality and goal-oriented interview questions, this one could take you out of the running if you respond with something interviewers don't want to hear.

Follow these tips to develop a solid answer that leaves a lasting impact.

Give Some Context About Your Background

Everyone's priorities change as their career evolves. What was important to you at the start of your career might not be the same at this point in your life. That could be why you're looking for a new job and moving forward in your career.

Whatever the case, provide context about your background to show the interviewer why you're there. You don't have to get into a long, complex story. A concise answer is always best.

However, some brief context can paint a clear picture of who you are and what you want out of your career. It gives the interviewer more insight into the journey thus far and how you want it to continue changing moving forward. That knowledge helps them learn more about what you have to offer.

Talking about your background explains your motivations and what's important to you in your next position. It's more impactful than simply stating that you want to do a good job and contribute to the company. Providing context is like offering proof of those statements, highlighting why you're a fantastic fit!

Keep your explanation brief, but don't be afraid to mention where you were and how things are different now. For example, you could talk about your priorities early in your career and discuss how things changed. Then, end on your current priorities and what you're looking for at this stage in your career and life.

Connect It to the Position & Company

The best way to answer "What is most important to you in your next position?" is to link everything back to the position and company. Ultimately, the goal is to show the interviewer why you fit with the company's mission and culture. Typical answers can do that, but connecting the dots with your response leaves no shadow of a doubt.

When you talk about what's important to you from a job and career, highlight how the position offers that. For example, you might be at a point where you're ready to take on more responsibilities. If you're applying for a management or team head role, it's the perfect transition.

You can point out how the position fits what you're looking for, letting the interviewer know precisely why you applied to this job. It also nails the point that you're motivated to do a good job. When you draw that line, it's impossible not to see how you have intrinsic motivations to succeed and that this job is about more than money.

Do the same with the company itself. Perhaps a detail in the organization's mission statement aligns with your big-picture goals. Talk about why this is important to you and link everything back to this job opportunity.

Keep Your Answer Brief

This is a question that could easily turn into a long-winded conversation. But always remember that this is just one of many questions the interviewer needs to get through! Don't spend a ton of time going into too much detail.

Concise responses are always the better choice. Aim for an answer no longer than two minutes.

When you keep things brief, your words are more likely to be memorable. Get to the point quickly, say what you need to say, and move on!

Rambling about random things that are important to you in a job can make you seem unprepared or unorganized. Many people will talk nonsense until they come up with an answer that resembles something meaningful. It's akin to throwing what you can at the wall and hoping something sticks.

Interviewers hear those responses all the time, and they rarely work out in an applicant's favor. But those quick and concise answers? They show that you've given this question some thought already. It reflects well on you.

Practice

Our final tip is an easy one: Practice!

Rehearsing your answer to "What is most important to you in your next position?" is critical. This isn't something you want to think about on the spot and "wing." It's a complex question that requires significant thought and preparation.

Don't be afraid to write down key points you want to hit. Use those to practice multiple ways to answer. You never know how the interviewer will phrase the question, so you want to have some flexibility.

Avoid creating strict scripts. They come off as over-rehearsed and inauthentic. Instead, know what points you want to hit in your answer and be comfortable talking about them organically.

Practice with several people if you can. Get comfortable providing this answer; it'll come out naturally during your interview.

Example Answers

How you answer this question depends entirely on your experiences and goals. Everyone's response will be unique, and there's no universally correct answer.

That said, it pays to have some examples to draw inspiration from when figuring out what to say.

Example 1

In our first example, the applicant is applying for a leadership role. They're interviewing to be a project manager after several years of working as an engineer. With this response, they're laying out exactly what's important to them and why they're there, drawing an undeniable connection between their goals and what this position offers.

"The ability to apply my skills in challenging ways is the most important thing for me at this point in my career. I've spent several years working as a civil engineer. During that time, I learned valuable skills I'm ready to use.

I was lucky to work on many projects I was proud of in my previous job. I also worked with many different people and enjoyed the diversity of people and projects.

I believe that the mix of complex commercial and industrial projects your company handles is the perfect way to broaden my horizons and put my skills to the test. My next goal is to run large-scale projects, lead teams, and solve complex engineering challenges.

My career thus far has prepared me for this role, and I am ready for my next challenge."

Example 2

In our next example, the applicant's main priority is opportunities for career growth. This model response can apply to virtually any industry and step up the career ladder. It's a good response for young workers trying to move beyond entry-level positions.

However, it also applies to those attempting to enter the C-suite territory. With this response, you're highlighting natural motivations while indicating your willingness to grow with the company.

"At this point in my life and career, the opportunity for growth is what I look for in my next position. My last job afforded me the chance to find my groove within this industry. I learned the ins and outs and got the opportunity to figure out where I wanted to go.

Now, my ultimate goal is growth potential. Whether in my own role, within a company, or as a part of an organization's larger growth goals, I want to be in a challenging environment with opportunities for continual improvement.

I believe that your company's focus on innovation, opportunity, and expansion fits that bill. I'm eager to be a part of what your company is doing, and I hope that I can contribute to those goals in this role."

Example 3

Our final example shows how being complementary can help make a good impression. In this scenario, the applicant is a teacher looking to get hired at a new school. The response is a bit different from others.

The most important thing for the applicant is not related to personal growth or career development. Instead, it's finding an employer that supports the position and the employee who holds it.

The applicant shares positives about the organization while showing their ultimate motivation to do a good job.

"As a teacher, my mission is always to prepare my students for success in and out of the classroom. Recently, it's been a struggle to fulfill that mission due to low budgets, inadequate resources, and high student-to-teacher ratios. Those barriers created many challenges.

At this point in my career, what's most important to me in my next position is to work for a school capable of supporting teachers. Given your school's fantastic reputation, the prospect of working here is exciting. Not only do you have the operating budget, but you have the lowest student-to-teacher ratio in the county.

I'm eager for the opportunity to devote the time and attention every student deserves."

Conclusion

Explaining what's most important to you in a position can seem challenging at first, but it's actually quite straightforward. All it takes is a little preparation to score some major points with your answer!

Back

Seeking Veterans for the midterm elections

By news.VA.gov | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

As political candidates jockey for support during the stretch run to the U.S. midterm elections on November 8, state and local officials are scrambling to staff polling sites with election volunteers. Major indicators are projecting a massive poll worker shortage for the 2022 midterms and beyond.

Aware of this potential crisis, the Vet the Vote campaign is seeking to recruit 100,000 Veterans and military family members to be poll workers in the 2022 midterms and other future elections. Vet the Vote is a coalition of 26 Veteran and military service organizations and four civic groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Football League (NFL).

More than 1 million volunteers are needed to run national elections. If only 10% of the 17 million American Veterans enlisted as poll workers, that would easily fill the void of any poll worker shortage.

"Poll workers tend to come from our senior citizen population, and concerns regarding COVID-19 have understandably decreased volunteerism among that population," said Air Force Veteran Anil Nathan, an executive director of the nonprofit group We the Veterans, which organized the campaign. "In general, though, there's a constant need to mobilize new poll workers, and we would like to see the Veteran and military family community make volunteering as poll workers a new norm of public service within our community."

Poll workers key to preserving integrity of elections

Poll workers play a critical role in elections while getting to see the truest form of American democracy in action. They are responsible for opening the polls in the morning; checking in voters and issuing ballots; maintaining the chain of custody of ballots, voting equipment and supplies; and reconciling the number of voters checked in with the number of ballots cast at their location, among other duties. Poll workers make on average $100 to $150 a day, including paid training in many locations.

But a shortage of poll workers can create operational challenges, including the unexpected closure of polling sites and long lines.

Army Veteran James Hardaway is training to be a poll worker during the early voting period from October 20 to November 5 in Raleigh, North Carolina. He'll be on the staff at North Carolina State University processing ballots with election software and will assist voters in other ways.

Hardaway believes his role as a poll worker is key to preserving the integrity of the election.

"I registered to be an election precinct staff member to help reinforce trust in our election process, as Veterans have earned an extremely high level of trust in this area," he said. "It is critical to ensure that each voter is properly processed so their vote is counted."

In the Army, Hardaway served in countries where free and democratic elections weren't guaranteed. While Iraq's coalition government was being created, he was in Tikrit during the country's 2008 legislative elections and in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, during the 2010 parliamentary elections.

"I've seen the transformative power that elections can have on countries when citizens trust the outcome," he said. "Those experiences caused me to look differently at our own processes and never take them for granted. Additionally, many states, including North Carolina, are short on election staff this cycle. I want to ensure that everyone has easy access to vote when it's right for them. Fewer staff means longer lines and potentially less time available for potential voters."

family photo of man, woman, small child and baby

Air Force Veteran Kristen Berg, pictured here with her family, served as a poll worker in Wisconsin during the 2020 presidential election.

"It's in our blood"

"When I left the military, I was ready to transition to civilian life, but I think a lot of Veterans maintain a longstanding desire to serve," she said. "It's in our blood, so to speak. Whether it's in a nationwide movement, such as voting, or even local community involvement, church events or helping with our kids' assorted activities. Working at the polls is a great way to answer a larger call, and I found personal value and fulfillment in doing so."

Thus far, the Vet the Vote campaign has recruited more than 2,000 Veterans and military family members to serve as poll workers—enough to staff over 200 large polling stations. However, the number of volunteers is expected to escalate as Vet the Vote's partnership with the NFL takes hold with the kickoff of the 2022 football season, and as the Vet the Vote coalition reaches more of its direct audience of 3.5 million people as the midterms draw closer.

Vet the Vote filmed a public service announcement with the NFL that will run on the NFL Network. The campaign is also engaging with many teams and planning on in-person events at games. The NFL has also been supporting the campaign on its social media through the league's NFL Votes initiative.

Officials often recruit poll workers at the last minute

With training needed for poll workers, it's important for Veterans and military family members to volunteer as soon as possible to have the greatest chance of serving. However, Vet the Vote campaign leaders are encouraging volunteers to consider enlisting even late into the election cycle.

"We've heard directly from election officials in a few states that they often end up recruiting poll workers at the last minute because people's schedules change, and they are unable to work," Nathan said. "One official told us that 20% of her poll worker staff reported the week before a primary that they could not work the polls that day. She was scrambling to recruit. It's a very fluid dynamic, and people should prepare to be called up at the last minute."

  • Veterans can receive around $150 per day for serving as a county poll worker.
  • 60% of counties report a shortage of poll workers for 2022 election cycle.
  • Vet the Vote makes it easy for Veterans to apply to be poll workers.

Sign up to be a poll worker. The Vet the Vote campaign will be providing heavily discounted Vet the Vote t-shirts to those who register.

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Veterans should verify the information with the organization offering.

Back

How To Ask For Feedback After A Job Rejection (Properly)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing how to ask for feedback after a job rejection can benefit your career in a number of ways. While it's never ideal to get passed on for a job you want, it's realistic to assume that it will likely happen to you at some point.

This guide will teach you how to ask for feedback after a job rejection and provide you with some sample emails to make the process easier.

How to Ask for Feedback After a Job Rejection

Getting rejected for a job can be tough. That's especially true if it was a job you were genuinely interested in and went through several rounds of interviews. While you can do everything in your power to prepare, rejections happen.

The best way to handle those moments is to ask for feedback. Understanding why hiring managers passed up can help you in your future endeavors, equipping you with the knowledge you need to improve. Here are a few tips on how to ask for feedback after a job rejection in a way that reflects well on you.

Reach Out to the Right Person

When asking for feedback after a job rejection, the first thing you need to do is figure out who you should talk to. During the hiring process, you'll likely speak to multiple people. You might interact with someone in human resources, talk to a dedicated recruiter, or communicate with the hiring manager directly.

Typically, the best person to ask for feedback is the one who delivers the news (often through a rejection email). In most cases, that will be a recruiter or hiring manager.

Even if you spent more time interacting with an interviewer, they might not have anything to do with the final hiring decision. Hiring managers are usually the ones who choose who to hire and who to pass on. Asking for feedback from someone who doesn't play any part in that decision-making process would be pointless.

If the recruiter was the person who told you that you didn't get the job, they might have an idea why. That's not always the case, but they generally act as the liaison between the organization and the applicant. They are the middle-person and often have insight into why the company made its decision.

Recruiters root for you, so most are willing to pass on that information.

Now, if you didn't hear directly from the hiring manager, you might feel tempted to contact them anyway. You can do so, but tread lightly. If a critical decision-maker passes the task of delivering bad news to a secretary or assistant, they probably won't have the time to provide feedback.

It's better to talk to your last point of contact or the manager who let you know you were rejected.

Ask for Feedback at the Right Time

The right time to ask for feedback after a job rejection can vary. This is an area where you'll often hear some conflicting advice. Some people believe that you should ask for feedback immediately, but doing so isn't always the wisest choice.

The best approach is usually to ask for feedback within 24 hours, but to avoid getting back to them instantly. Here's why:

Imagine being in the hiring manager's position. They likely have a list of people they need to call. All of those individuals but one will hear bad news.

Managers get used to rejecting applicants, but that doesn't make it any easier. Asking someone to tell you why they didn't want to hire you puts them on the spot. It creates an uncomfortable situation; many managers aren't expected to hear that question.

As a result, it can create a genuinely awkward moment that doesn't shine anyone in a good light. Give hiring managers a moment to collect their thoughts before you ask for feedback. The best course of action is to wait and send an email. Even if the hiring manager delivered the bad news by phone, refrain from asking during that call.

Instead, wait a few hours and send an email so that they can take their time to develop a constructive answer. Asking on the spot might send them scrambling to come up with reasons, ending up in a response that's not helpful.

Aim to send that feedback request within 24 hours. You want to ask for feedback about the rejection when you're still on their mind, allowing them to provide an honest and helpful answer.

Ask What You Can Do to Improve

The point of asking for feedback after a job rejection is to learn and grow from the experience. When doing this, ask for pointers on how you can improve. You can be as broad or specific as you want.

However, open-ended questions are usually best. That allows the hiring manager to provide the information they feel comfortable divulging. For example, you could ask what they would like to see on your resume if you reapply for the company sometime in the future.

With a question like that, the manager might tell you that you lacked the amount of experience or qualifications the company was after. It's better than a pointed question about what went wrong during the interview or why they didn't like you.

Ask how you can improve, but don't put the person you're contacting in a bind. Let the person you're talking to share when they want without forcing them to say anything they're not comfortable saying. Focus on actionable tips.

You can ask about what skills they would like to see, if the level of experience you have is enough, or if there is anything missing that they want to see. There's always room for improvement, so listen to what the hiring manager says and take it to heart.

Accept Their Feedback

It's not easy hearing the reason why you were rejected. Sometimes, it's simply that someone had better qualifications than you. But in other times, glaring issues or interview missteps cost you the opportunity.

Whatever the case might be, accept the feedback and move on. There's nothing you can do about the situation now. Even if you don't like what you hear, resist the urge to push back.

Arguing with the hiring manager about their decision isn't going to make a difference, and it could hurt your chances of getting opportunities in the future. Bite your tongue no matter how much you disagree with what they say.

Accepting feedback should also apply if they don't want to provide any at all! Some hiring managers don't want to have that conversation. That's fine. There's no need to press them on it.

Hearing any amount of criticism can be frustrating, but accept it with grace and apply it to your job hunt moving forward.

Plant a Seed for Future Interviews

When asking for feedback after a job rejection, you always want to plant the seeds for potential opportunities in the future. Just because you were rejected now doesn't mean that the hiring manager didn't like you or thought you had nothing to offer. As we mentioned earlier, sometimes the issue is that someone with better qualifications walks through the door.

Always leave things open for future interviews. Thank them for the opportunity and the feedback they provide. Then, mention that you'd be open to staying in contact and getting considered for other roles that open up.

You don't have to make it a big deal. A quick note about how you'd enjoy the chance to discuss future opportunities is all you need. From there, you can connect on LinkedIn and keep tabs on new positions as they become available.

Who knows? A similar role might open up not long after the rejection. If you leave the door open, a hiring manager could call you directly for another interview!

How To Approach This Over the Phone

The standard approach when asking for feedback after a job rejection is usually to send an email.

But what if you have the hiring manager or recruiter on the phone? Can you ask then?

It is possible to ask for feedback on the same call, and some people will have no problem giving it immediately. But be cautious about this tactic. Asking for feedback immediately on the same call could put the manager on the spot.

That can lead to an awkward and potentially unhelpful conversation.

If you must ask for feedback on the phone, be extra gracious. Instead of asking for it now, you can always request to set up a phone conversation for a later date. That typically goes over better than asking for feedback on the spot.

It shows that you're aware of the hiring manager's busy schedule. There's a good chance you're not the only phone call they have to make about a rejection. Plus, it gives them time to figure out what advice they want to share.

What to Avoid When Asking for Feedback

Requesting feedback after a job rejection is a delicate conversation. Now that you know how to broach the topic with respect and grace let's go over some things you should avoid.

An Upset or Argumentative Tone

Never begin this conversation on a sour note. It's understandable to be upset, but don't let that frustration turn into negative energy. Whether you're on the phone or communicating through email doesn't matter. Hiring managers can tell when people are upset.

Being rude and combating every piece of advice will not work in your favor. It essentially ruins your chances of ever getting a job at that organization. Not only that, but word travels fast. That hiring manager can tell others, ruining your reputation in your city and industry.

Don't burn bridges! It's the worst thing you can do, so always be respectful.

Desperation and Begging

Begging for a job can be just as bad as being argumentative. Nothing sours a hiring manager's opinion on a candidate more than groveling. It's not a good look and could hurt any future opportunities with the company.

Keep things positive. You can accept feedback with grace and move on. Remember that this job opportunity isn't the only one you'll get. There are other fish in the sea, but this one wasn't for you.

Attempting to Change the Decision

Finally, don't try to change the hiring manager's mind after asking for feedback. If that is your goal, you might as well stop trying to get feedback. That's not the point of this follow-up request.

It's about learning, accepting failure, and moving on. Trying to change the decision comes off as both desperate, pushy, or disrespectful. Furthermore, the futile attempt will likely squash your chances of getting helpful feedback.

Sample Emails

Asking for feedback after a job rejection isn't easy, but it's a great way to learn and improve. Every rejection is just an experience to prepare you for the future. If you're unsure how to broach the subject with hiring managers, here are a couple of sample emails to inspire you.

Sample 1

The first email is a universally good example. It can work with any job and hits all the marks. It's respectful, asks for advice, and doesn't burn any bridges.

"Dear Mr. Smith,

I thank you for your time and for following up with your decision.

While I am disappointed that I won't have the chance to work for [COMPANY], I respect your decision and appreciate your consideration. I'm always looking for ways to improve myself and my career. Can you share any feedback that might help me when applying for a position at your company in the future?

I truly appreciate your time in this process. If another role opens up that you feel I would be a good fit for, please don't hesitate to contact me. Thank you again for your consideration."

Sample 2

In our second example, the applicant asks for specific feedback on their skills and qualifications. The request is still respectful and leaves the door open for future contact with the hiring manager.

"Dear Ms. Johnson,

Thank you for considering me for the job at [COMPANY]. While it didn't work out, I enjoyed our discussions and the opportunity to meet your team. I hope that you'll consider me in the future for positions you feel that I could succeed in.

As someone committed to continuous self-improvement, I'd like to ask for some feedback. More specifically, I'd like to know if there were any skills or qualifications that I lacked for this role. I appreciate any feedback you can share with me that would help me in my career.

I thank you for your time and hope to meet with you at some point in the future."

Conclusion

Now that you know how to ask for feedback after a job rejection, it's important to take advantage of the opportunity when it comes. Missing out on a job isn't fun, but you can use it to learn how to make yourself a more competitive applicant in the future!

Back

What you need to know about VA benefits in the aftermath of Hurricanes Fiona and Ian

By news.VA.gov | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

Recent hurricanes have caused incredible destruction, leaving millions to grapple with the devastating impact and loss of life. Veterans and their families in regions affected by hurricanes Fiona and Ian can access VA resources and benefits to get the support they need after a natural disaster.

One of the first places you can visit to receive help and resources is your state's VA Regional Benefits Office. You can look up your office's hours of operation, services and location at our facilities locator webpage.

Additional resources in the wake of a disaster

Veterans Crisis Line

If you are in a crisis—or are concerned about someone else in crisis—get free, confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Veterans Crisis Line is available by phone, text or chat:

  • Dial 988, then Press 1.
  • Send a text to 838255.
  • Chat online.
  • Support for deaf and hard of hearing: Call 1-800-799-4889.

Housing Assistance

If you or a Veteran you know needs immediate housing assistance in the aftermath of a hurricane, call the National Call Center for Homeless Veterans at 1-877-4AID VET (877-424-3838). Calls are answered 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Learn more about housing assistance here.

Benefits Delivery

If you or a beneficiary were not able to receive a benefit payment after a hurricane, call the VA National Call Center at 1-800-827-1000. Call center representatives can guide you on how to request a one-time special payment.

VA Home Loans

If you need help making a mortgage payment, VA can:

  • Ask lenders to put a 90-day freeze on foreclosure.
  • Encourage lenders to waive late charges.
  • Work with your mortgage lender to apply pre-payments already made to your upcoming payment.

Learn more about VA Home Loans here.

GI Bill

If your school is temporarily closed due to a hurricane, VA will continue payments through the end of the term or for up to four weeks (28 calendar days) from the date of school closure, whichever is earlier. Learn more about the GI Bill here.

Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR&E)

If you are displaced due to a hurricane and receive employment services from VA, you may qualify for two additional months of Employee Adjustment Allowance (EAA). Learn more about VR&E here.

Mail Contingency

If hurricane-related mail service disruptions impact the timeliness of VA receiving important claims paperwork or information from you, know that VA accounts for these disaster-related impacts and will not penalize you for subsequent mail delays. You may also submit claims and upload any other relevant benefits information through your VA.gov account.

Learn More

To learn more about disaster assistance resources for Veterans, visit the website here.

Back