The 29 Best Jobs For People With Social Anxiety In 2023

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

In this day and age there are a number of good jobs for people with social anxiety. The variety of positions in the job market and a rise in remote work means that there are plenty of options available. This list will help you come up with some ideas that fit your needs. 1. Developer. Many different kinds of developer positions are perfect for people with social anxiety. You can explore careers in web development, creating dynamic websites for clients looking to advertise their products or brand. Alternatively, you can become a software developer to help make the next big app or game. Whatever the case, developer jobs are great for people with social anxiety because they're largely independent. Your work contributes to a larger effort, and you may need to interact with supervisors and team members. However, the brunt of the... Read more

Combat Veterans, professional athletes join forces to support one another

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2023, Reprinted with permission

Merging Vets and Players (MVP) was created in 2015 by Jay Glazer, a Fox Sports analyst, and Nate Boyer, a former Green Beret and NFL alumni, to address the similar challenges that combat Veterans and former professional athletes face when the uniform comes off. As a weekly peer support program, MVP creates a new team for these men and women and works to help them find new purpose, meaning and identity as they face the challenges head-on together rather than alone. By staying connected beyond the weekly sessions through various events, communication and trusted resources, members experience an ecosystem of support. MVP conducts multiple in-person chapters nationwide, and a virtual chapter, which allows Veterans to join from even the most remote areas. Veterans must meet eligibility requirements and membership is free. MVP chapter locations and time information are available here.... Read more

5 Networking Tips To Help You Do It Better

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Networking is one of the demons job seekers dread, avoid, and start too late. But if you keep these five networking tips in mind, you'll find there are opportunities to network, the right way, everywhere. The truth is when you network you aren't asking for a job. You're seeking information. And let's agree to stop calling these one-on-one meetings an informational interview. It isn't an interview at all. It's a conversation. It's a meeting. Here are networking tips to help you do this better! Be Clear and Sincere. Your request for a conversation must be sincere and free of hidden agendas. You will not ask for a job, you won't even mention the word job during your conversation. In all honesty, you don't even know if you want a job there yet. You need to get the insider's perspective, advice and information first.... Read more

Polish your resume: VA needs environmental service technicians

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2023, Reprinted with permission

Behind the scenes of the cutting-edge medical care we offer at VA are thousands of environmental service (EVS) technicians and housekeeping aides who keep our medical centers and outpatient clinics clean and safe for Veterans. These support services jobs are often working behind the scenes, but are vital to maintain the integrity of clean, safe care at VA. For environmental service technicians, "clean" and "safe" are a way of life. They address spills quickly, discard trash, install light bulbs in halls and rooms, and vacuum and scrub floors. While our clinical care teams are keeping Veterans healthy, environmental service technicians keep facilities healthy. Through their work, they maintain and promote a safe environment for Veterans. We are actively looking to fill numerous positions across the nation with quality employees who are... Read more

Database Manager - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
Administrative Assistant - Park Lawn Corporation - NM
Fire Alarm & Suppression Technician Level II - CertaSite - Dayton - OH
Sales Financial Analyst - Performance Health - Warrenville - IL
C-11-24 Eduation Outreach Specialist (PT 2Yr Time Limited) - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
  • LinkedIn Mastery for Veterans and Transitioning Service Members

Complete list of Partners

Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair

July 25, 2024 - Online 11 AM - 2 PM EST

This Corporate Gray Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair provides military-experienced job seekers the opportunity to interview with employers nationwide via text chat and video. The event is for transitioning service members, veterans, and military spouses. Most participating employers require U.S. citizenship and cleared (or clearable) candidates for many positions. Job seekers are required to pre-register and upload their resume to participate in the event. Registered candidates will receive a Virtual Job Fair Training Guide and the Job Fair Employer Directory prior to the Virtual Job Fair. For more information: CorporateGray.com/jobfairs/492

FREE U.S. Veterans Magazine Subscription for TAOnline Members!

U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) Is the premiere resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation's veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America, and the federal government.
Subscribe for FREE today!

The 29 Best Jobs For People With Social Anxiety In 2023

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

In this day and age there are a number of good jobs for people with social anxiety. The variety of positions in the job market and a rise in remote work means that there are plenty of options available.

This list will help you come up with some ideas that fit your needs.

Developer

Many different kinds of developer positions are perfect for people with social anxiety. You can explore careers in web development, creating dynamic websites for clients looking to advertise their products or brand. Alternatively, you can become a software developer to help make the next big app or game.

Whatever the case, developer jobs are great for people with social anxiety because they're largely independent. Your work contributes to a larger effort, and you may need to interact with supervisors and team members. However, the brunt of the job is sitting in front of a computer and working alone.

As a result, you have full control over your environment. Many developers have remote jobs that are either full-time or several days a week.

Video Editor

If you want to limit the amount of time you're forced to spend with others at work, consider exploring a career in video editing. This profession is versatile. Some editors work to perfect content for social media. Others work at studios, playing a part in creating films and TV shows.

The unique thing about video editing is that the work often occurs in dedicated editing bays. These bays provide ultimate privacy, allowing you to focus on your work without distractions. Bays are usually in quiet areas of a studio or office, ensuring peace and quiet as you work.

Accountant

Accountants manage finances and can work for individuals or large companies. The job requires plenty of math to crunch the numbers, and your responsibilities can vary from one job to the next. An accountant working for a company may be responsible for managing multiple accounts. Meanwhile, another may work with individuals to manage wealth, file taxes, etc.

Most of an accountant's work is solitary, making it one of the best jobs for people with social anxiety. There are some moments of social interaction, such as when you meet with clients or present your work to high-level supervisors. But when you are diligent in your work, most of those interactions are positive.

Technical Writer

Technical writers are detail-oriented workers that create documents that help others understand complex topics. It's not like creative writing. The work is strictly technical, and your job might require you to craft documents like product manuals, white papers, and more.

This job is good for people with social anxiety because it's largely independent. As a technical writer, you'll spend most of your time researching topics and finding ways to communicate concepts for readers to understand.

There is some level of interaction since technical writing typically comes with review and feedback phases. Those moments can be intimidating if you're new, but most of your time as a technical writer is for solo work.

Data Scientist

If you like to solve problems and analyze data, this job is right up your alley. A data scientist is someone who sources, manages, and scrutinizes mountains of data. Their job is to understand what questions need answering and figure out how to answer them!

Companies in every industry need data scientists, so there's substantial versatility in this career. But regardless of what industry you work in, the job remains the same. Your days as a data scientist will consist of looking at spreadsheets and data to find solutions to your employer's problem.

You will need to interact with others from time to time, but most of the job is working alone with nothing but you and your computer.

Landscaper

Landscaping jobs let you work in the great outdoors all day! Being outside, surrounded by nature, is something many people with social anxiety benefit from. Why not explore a career that lets you breathe in the fresh air as you work?

There's tons of variety in the landscaping industry. You can work for a company that manages residential properties. In those jobs, you can maintain yards and tap into your creativity to complete beautiful renovations.

Landscapers also work for larger commercial properties like school campuses and business parks. You could even start your own business!

Illustrator

Illustrators typically work alone. Outside of brief meetings with clients and simple presentations, most of the day-to-day is in front of a computer and a drawing tablet.

It's a great job for people with social anxiety because the work environment is more versatile and calm. Furthermore, the work can be a creative outlet. If you're passionate about art and want to push your skills in your career, it's the perfect match!

Editor

This job is similar to that of a video editor. But instead of editing visual content, your job revolves around perfecting written text and copy.

Another key distinction is the editor's role in the content production cycle. As an editor, you don't write the text yourself. Instead, you view other peoples' work, provide feedback, and work to perfect a piece before it reaches publishing.

This job is good for people with social anxiety because it removes the element of having to put your work up for potential judgment. You're the one who will provide feedback to others. Therefore, it tends to be a pretty low-stress job.

Graphic Designer

Graphic designers work similarly to illustrators. The job requires you to create amazing works of art that many people will see. This field has a lot of variety and jobs can revolve around creating corporate branding, logos, visual content for advertisements, and more.

It's worth pointing out that you will work with others from time to time. For example, graphic designers sometimes work as part of a larger team. You may also have meetings with clients or supervisors.

But outside those instances, most of the job is solo. You can work independently while completing tasks that align with your interests and passions.

Electrician

You might spend some time working with others or interacting with clients. But for the most part, you'll spend a lot of time on your own as an electrician!

Electricians deal with electrical systems. It's a detail-oriented job that requires you to work with your hands to keep everything functioning.

Like other trade jobs, getting started in this field is pretty straightforward. Plus, there's ample room for growth as you improve your skills, gain experience, and get certifications.

Transcriber

Here's another job that requires complete silence and a calm environment. Like video editors, most transcribers operate in quiet corners of the office. Many even work from home!

Transcription is the act of putting audio into text. It's a transcriber's job to listen to audio content and put it into writing. These jobs require great attention to detail, the ability to type fast, and excellent grammar.

The good news is that it's mostly independent.

Content Creator

Content creators can work with many different mediums. Depending on the role, you may spend days crafting copy for a blog, short videos for social media, and more.

Like other creative-based jobs, content creation is largely solo. Outside of team meetings and client interactions, you'll spend your days working alone while tapping into many skills. It's a fun profession that people with social anxiety can thrive in.

Photographer

Photographers capture the beauty of still life! Your job is to use a camera to take photos. Depending on the role, you may also have to do light editing.

The amount of time you need to collaborate with others depends on how you work. Some photographers work freelance, capturing beautiful art and selling it to buyers. Others work as part of larger teams, focusing on specific projects. Many photographers also work in studios to complete family portraits.

Whatever the case, it's a passion-based profession that's rewarding and versatile enough for people with social anxiety.

IT Professional

Every industry needs IT professionals. In our connected world, it's a career with amazing prospects for the future.

IT professionals wear many hats. They can create networks, build communication systems, and work to keep everything running smoothly in this digital world. Many businesses have dedicated IT departments. However, some only have a handful of IT professionals on staff.

The job requires attention to detail and good problem-solving skills. It's good for people with social anxiety because most of the work is independent and away from the bustle of a busy office.

Driver

There are countless opportunities for drivers. While some people turn to ridesharing platforms, those jobs often have situations that aren't great for people who get anxious around others. But other roles, such as truck or delivery drivers, can be the perfect fit.

Truck drivers are the unsung heroes of modern business, delivering goods across the country. As a driver, you can spend days on the road, enjoying the peace of solitude.

Virtual Assistant

Here's a job for people who do well with digital communications. While not everyone with social anxiety thrives managing a ton of emails, some do. If you don't mind digital interactions, being a virtual assistant has many perks.

You can do the same administrative tasks as an in-person assistant. But instead of working in an office, everything is remote. Many virtual assistants work from home to manage their employer's schedule, handle travel arrangements, run email accounts, and more.

Researcher

If you're detail-oriented and love to perform in-depth research, this is a fantastic job to consider. Researchers spend their days gathering data. What that research entails will depend on the job.

Some researchers fact-check for lawyers or publications. Others gather information about complex topics.

Whatever the case, the job is mostly independent.

Animal Caretaker

Love animals? Becoming an animal caretaker is often considered one of the best jobs for people with social anxiety.

There are many jobs worth exploring. You can consider becoming a veterinary technician, a zookeeper, or a care assistant at an animal shelter.

These jobs require some social interactions. However, most of the work involves nothing but interactions with animals! It's great for social anxiety because it feeds into existing passions if you're an animal lover.

Plumber

Plumbers have many of the same social and mental health benefits as an electrician. Plumbing is an in-demand trade that mostly requires solo work. You may interact with clients or work as part of a team, but most plumbers spend their days working alone.

As a plumber, it's your job to install, maintain, and repair plumbing systems. From showers to toilets, plumbers do it all. There are plenty of opportunities to work with an existing company, or go out on your own.

Librarian

What better way to manage social anxiety than to work in a setting that demands quiet? Libraries are the quintessential tranquil setting.

People go there to read and research. Some social interactions come into play as you recommend books, assist visitors, and check out media. However, you won't have to worry about tons of chit-chat or loud people.

Statistician

Becoming a statistician is a fantastic career if you are detail-oriented and love math. This is an in-demand career with substantial growth projections in the next decade. It can be a lucrative profession, and the independent nature of the job makes it a good choice for people with social anxiety.

Statisticians work with complex data. They analyze and interpret the data to identify trends, determine relationships, and more.

Horticulturist

Here's another passion-based job that people with social anxiety can thrive in. If you love plants, it's a career worth exploring. A horticulturist spends most of their day surrounded by nature.

Simply put, the job requires you to manage and take care of plants. That involves cultivating plants from seed, trimming, pruning, and more. It's about keeping plants healthy and thriving.

Orthotist or Prosthetist

Here's a job that's in the medical field, but unlike other patient-facing roles, orthotists and prosthetists typically work alone. Some patient interactions are involved, but most work requires you to operate independently as you create support items.

An orthotist specializes in splints and braces to support specific body parts. Meanwhile, a prosthetist creates prosthetics for people with disabilities. It's a rewarding career that makes a difference in patients' lives.

Entrepreneur

Instead of working for a company and putting yourself in socially demanding situations, you can become an entrepreneur and create your own business.

It's the ultimate form of career freedom because you can run your business however you want. You have full control and can create the work environment that suits your needs.

Astronomer

Astronomy is a unique field of science that focuses on the stars. An astronomer studies the universe and works to answer questions outside the scope of Earth.

It's one of the best jobs for people with social anxiety because it requires independent work in settings that are usually far removed from the traditional office setting. Many astronomers work in remote locations where light pollution doesn't affect telescopes. Others work in quiet offices, analyzing data and performing experiments.

Wildlife Biologist

Here's another job that caters to animal lovers. A wildlife biologist studies animals and ecosystems.

For people with social anxiety, it's the perfect match. The job involves interactions with animals, and work often occurs in remote locations away from humans. You may find yourself spending hours observing animals in their natural habitat or gathering data about the environment they live in.

Counselor

Unlike most jobs on this list, becoming a counselor involves substantial human interaction. But interestingly enough, many people with social anxiety are great at it!

How?

Simply put, it's because this profession requires a lot of empathy. There are many types of counselors, but the profession involves working with others to address their problems and anxieties. As someone with social anxiety, you can empathize with patients and use your position to help others. It's rewarding, and your ability to connect with patients can lead to great success.

Tutor

Becoming a tutor can be a great choice for people with social anxiety for many reasons.

First, it's a versatile job. Some tutors work from home, communicating with students virtually. Others work at schools, educational companies, or on their own in a freelance setting.

The second reason is that it allows you to interact with others in a more controlled environment. Tutors often work one-on-one or with small groups. It's a great way to gain confidence and confront some of the challenges you might face.

Medical Billing & Coding Professional

Medical billers and coding professionals handle the data entry aspects of healthcare. The job may require light interactions with insurance companies or healthcare providers. However, most of the job requires no direct interpersonal interactions.

Many billers and coders work from home or in quiet offices. It's a solitary job with more control over the work environment.

What to Look for in a Job if You Have Social Anxiety

Maintaining your mental health is a top priority when you have social anxiety, but you still need to find jobs that allow you to remain productive and flourish in your career.

Consider these occupations a jumping-off point to begin exploring. One of these might open a door to a new world you never knew existed.

But it also helps to consider what aspects of a job will fit your needs. So, how do you find a job that lets you thrive?

Here's what to look for.

The Right Work Environment

One of the biggest factors to consider is the work environment. Social anxiety affects people in many ways, but a common thread is difficulty managing emotions and stress in social settings. Careers requiring you to operate in a buzzing office or participate in frequent people-facing situations can be challenging.

Finding a job that makes you feel safe and secure in your work is important. That typically means avoiding careers that constantly put you into stressful situations, such as open-concept offices or roles that require regular meetings and presentations.

Before applying for a job, research its requirements. Understand the company, its culture, and its office environment to determine if it's right for you.

Independent Work

Another thing to consider is what your day-to-day looks like. Generally, people with social anxiety do best when most of their work is independent.

Many careers require some interaction with supervisors and team members on some level, but those with social anxiety thrive when they can complete their core work without much interaction with others. And fortunately, many careers require a lot of independent work. Some have opportunities to work from home, allowing you to work at your pace and in an environment that benefits you.

Mental Health Support

More employers are investing in mental health support. If you have social anxiety, those are the companies you want to look into!

Companies that offer mental health services are usually more understanding and can accommodate your unique needs. Those employers aim to help you find a workstyle that allows you to optimize productivity, often providing more options for where, when, and how you work.

Jobs That Fuel Your Passion

Finally, always consider your genuine passions and interests. Your career should be fulfilling! Working in a field you care about is rewarding and makes dealing with social anxiety much easier.

You can feel more confident in what you do. Sticking to your passions can help you feel excited to come to work, combating the usual struggles and stresses of social anxiety.

Conclusion

As you can see, the best jobs for people with social anxiety tend to allow a certain amount of autonomy and usually can be done in a quiet setting. And fortunately, there are plenty of positions that fit that description.

Back

Combat Veterans, professional athletes join forces to support one another

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2023, Reprinted with permission

Merging Vets and Players (MVP) was created in 2015 by Jay Glazer, a Fox Sports analyst, and Nate Boyer, a former Green Beret and NFL alumni, to address the similar challenges that combat Veterans and former professional athletes face when the uniform comes off.

As a weekly peer support program, MVP creates a new team for these men and women and works to help them find new purpose, meaning and identity as they face the challenges head-on together rather than alone. By staying connected beyond the weekly sessions through various events, communication and trusted resources, members experience an ecosystem of support.

MVP conducts multiple in-person chapters nationwide, and a virtual chapter, which allows Veterans to join from even the most remote areas. Veterans must meet eligibility requirements and membership is free. MVP chapter locations and time information are available here.

Each chapter operates weekly at a local privately owned fitness facility, and members can expect these sessions to run for two hours. The first hour consists of team-based workouts with individual drills that create connection, communication and trust. During the second hour, members sit in "The Huddle", a circle to create a peer group of like-minded individuals who have shared life experiences. Every Huddle is facilitated by a peer-certified staff member of MVP who are also members of the program.

In addition to weekly peer-led sessions for members, MVP hosts community workouts and events that are open and inclusive of families, friends and community members. This inclusivity broadens our reach to those who can benefit from our model and support. We have seen the impactful results from the connections and work we do to build stronger communities. Our community contributions deepen the level of engagement and understanding of how Veterans continue to lead with purpose and serve in a new capacity.

MVP's weekly programming and membership is available at no cost to Veterans who served on active duty in a theater of combat operations (service in a war or campaign expedition in hostile waters and or on foreign soil that rated Hostile Fire Pay or Imminent Danger Pay). Veterans can find more information on eligibility requirements and sign up for membership here. Upon registration, Veterans will receive an email confirmation from their local chapter program manager to provide further direction on attending an MVP session and establishing connection and community.

Back

5 Networking Tips To Help You Do It Better

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Networking is one of the demons job seekers dread, avoid, and start too late. But if you keep these five networking tips in mind, you'll find there are opportunities to network, the right way, everywhere.

The truth is when you network you aren't asking for a job. You're seeking information. And let's agree to stop calling these one-on-one meetings an informational interview. It isn't an interview at all.

It's a conversation. It's a meeting.

Here are networking tips to help you do this better!

Be Clear and Sincere

Your request for a conversation must be sincere and free of hidden agendas. You will not ask for a job, you won't even mention the word job during your conversation. In all honesty, you don't even know if you want a job there yet. You need to get the insider's perspective, advice and information first.

To help you secure the meeting, phone call or chat, make sure you're crystal clear about the types of questions and topics you plan on covering. Remember, your goal is to acquire information, advice or recommendations. You can use this list to develop your networking meeting questions.

When you email someone, include a link to your LinkedIn profile and your value proposition. Your value proposition is focused on the needs of others and speaks to how you can help potential employers. It describes the problem or problems you solve. For example, a value proposition may read like this:

"Inspiring new business growth for small business owners by helping them target and engage with the right audience on social media platforms."

Tap Your Friends' Friends

Your friends would like to help you, but they usually don't know how. Do the heavy lifting and research who your friends know.

Look on Facebook and LinkedIn to see who is in their network. After you've done your research, email your friend and ask for an introduction.

Remember to explain exactly why his or her contact is of value to you. (Hint, it's not about asking about jobs, it's about asking for advice, information or recommendations).

It's best to craft an email that your friend can easily forward along to their contact. Your message should explain briefly why you want to meet this person and a concise summary of your background. It will make it much easier for your friend to take action because all they need to do is forward your message with their own brief note!

Participate in Professional Groups

The easiest way to network with other professionals in your industry or occupation is to attend in-person or online meetings or events. You can find these groups by searching the internet, asking professionals you know what groups they belong to, or even researching LinkedIn profiles of people in your industry to see if they've listed any professional associations or groups.

LinkedIn Events are another good way to learn and meet new people. You can search LinkedIn and filter by Events to find topics of interest.

FYI: LinkedIn Groups is another place to engage with professionals. If you want to connect with someone but have no mutual connections, carefully research the groups this person belongs to and join some of them. Once you share a group, you can reach out. This is a little-known secret and one of the best reasons to be active in groups!

Connect on LinkedIn

If there are people you used to work with that you aren't connected with yet, invite them to connect on LinkedIn. Similarly, if there are people you know (a lot or a little) in your industry, send them an invitation to connect.

Almost any message is better than the default message LinkedIn sends. Take one second and insert your own words to personalize your reason for wanting to connect.

Your message is limited to 185 characters, so you are forced to keep it short and sweet. Include these three elements in your LinkedIn introduction:

  1. State how you know the person you're inviting.
  2. Explain why you want to connect with him or her.
  3. Present your offer of reciprocity.

Email may be a better option for reaching out. Not everyone checks LinkedIn but you do know they will be checking email.

Keep In Touch

Once you've connected or met with someone, keep in touch.

Serving as a conduit of information is one way you can maintain your relationships. Share information that you think will help them. For example, you can send your new networking contact an interesting article.

Take note of birthdays, work anniversaries or mentions in the news. Send a note of congratulations.

Make it a goal to reach out at least once every three months. This helps you stay top of mind.

To see more ideas on how to stay top of mind, read this: Nurture Your Network with These 11 Ideas

The bottom line

It is the strength of your relationships that will help you learn about future opportunities and meet new contacts in your career field.

Don't put off these important conversations.

Back

Polish your resume: VA needs environmental service technicians

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2023, Reprinted with permission

Behind the scenes of the cutting-edge medical care we offer at VA are thousands of environmental service (EVS) technicians and housekeeping aides who keep our medical centers and outpatient clinics clean and safe for Veterans.

These support services jobs are often working behind the scenes, but are vital to maintain the integrity of clean, safe care at VA.

For environmental service technicians, "clean" and "safe" are a way of life. They address spills quickly, discard trash, install light bulbs in halls and rooms, and vacuum and scrub floors.

While our clinical care teams are keeping Veterans healthy, environmental service technicians keep facilities healthy. Through their work, they maintain and promote a safe environment for Veterans.

We are actively looking to fill numerous positions across the nation with quality employees who are invested in doing their part to help Veterans. With more than 1,300 facilities to maintain, the work of EVS technicians is never done, and we need your help to make sure Veterans get the care they deserve.

Work at VA

If cleanliness is next to godliness, then EVS technicians are the secret saints of our facilities. Learn more about the work they do and the rewards they earn at VA Careers.

Back