The Best Times To Apply For Jobs In 2024: Full Guide

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the best times to apply for jobs can help you during your search and give you a better understanding of the job search landscape around you. But is it really that important? This guide will cover the best times to look for jobs, and what you can do if your search falls outside of these windows. What is the Best Time to Look & Apply for Jobs Each Year? Finding the right job opportunity and going through the hiring process to get an offer can take months. It's a big time investment, and it's not just you who's putting in the effort. Companies dedicate many resources to finding the right person. While hiring managers can bring new people into the organization at any time during the year, hiring activity can be noticeably higher during certain months.... Read more

Best of 2023: Top Veteran Resources of the Year

By Mike Richman | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

Every week, VA sends a newsletter that is jam-packed with resources like free concert tickets, farming assistance, workout programs, national park passes and Veteran discounts on hundreds of services. VA makes no endorsements of the privately offered resources, but we share them to generate awareness of all that's available to the Veteran community. Here are the Top 10 most popular Veteran resources from 2023: 1. 2023 Veterans Day retail discounts, free meals and other offers. On Veterans Day 2023, Veterans and their families, caregivers and survivors had access to hundreds of free meals, discounts and other freebies. Click here to see a long list of discounts available year-round. 2. Veterans set to see cost-of-living increase to their benefits... Read more

Good Hobbies & Interests To Put On A Resume In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Figuring out what hobbies and interests to put on a resume can be tricky. Not only is it wise to choose some that you can relate to the job, but it's not always clear where you should put this section in the first place! This guide will help you choose some good interests to put on a resume if you're serious about getting hired. When You Should Consider Putting Interests & Hobbies on Your Resume. Whether or not you put an "interests and hobbies" section in your resume depends on a few factors. There's no perfect rule for this, and what you should do depends on your experience and the job you're trying to land. Typically, it's wise to leave this section out of your resume if you're a professional with many years of experience. Focusing on your skills, work experience, and certifications is better in those instances. Those details will provide plenty of insight and take enough room on your resume to make it stand out. It's also wise to leave off hobbies and interests if you hav...... Read more

Get a great job through American Corporate Partners

By American Corporate Partners | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

In 2023, a record number of post-9/11 Veterans found meaningful employment with a mentor's assistance — for free — from American Corporate Partners (ACP), a national nonprofit organization. The average starting salary was $93,000. ACP will help Veterans find a new position, get promoted and grow their civilian network. ACP helps post-9/11 Veterans find meaningful employment after the military. Whether Veterans are looking for a higher-paying job or seeking a promotion, ACP mentors coach Veterans toward great careers. More than 30,000 Veterans have found success through ACP since 2010. How to get started. Visit acp-usa.org and fill out a short online application. Answer questions about your career goals, military experience and mentoring preferences.... Read more

Database Manager - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
Administrative Assistant - Park Lawn Corporation - NM
Fire Alarm & Suppression Technician Level II - CertaSite - Dayton - OH
Sales Financial Analyst - Performance Health - Warrenville - IL
C-11-24 Eduation Outreach Specialist (PT 2Yr Time Limited) - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
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Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair

July 25, 2024 - Online 11 AM - 2 PM EST

This Corporate Gray Virtual Military-Friendly Job Fair provides military-experienced job seekers the opportunity to interview with employers nationwide via text chat and video. The event is for transitioning service members, veterans, and military spouses. Most participating employers require U.S. citizenship and cleared (or clearable) candidates for many positions. Job seekers are required to pre-register and upload their resume to participate in the event. Registered candidates will receive a Virtual Job Fair Training Guide and the Job Fair Employer Directory prior to the Virtual Job Fair. For more information: CorporateGray.com/jobfairs/492

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U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) Is the premiere resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation's veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America, and the federal government.
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The Best Times To Apply For Jobs In 2024: Full Guide

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the best times to apply for jobs can help you during your search and give you a better understanding of the job search landscape around you.

But is it really that important?

This guide will cover the best times to look for jobs, and what you can do if your search falls outside of these windows.

What is the Best Time to Look & Apply for Jobs Each Year?

Finding the right job opportunity and going through the hiring process to get an offer can take months. It's a big time investment, and it's not just you who's putting in the effort. Companies dedicate many resources to finding the right person.

While hiring managers can bring new people into the organization at any time during the year, hiring activity can be noticeably higher during certain months.

While there are no guarantees (and you shouldn't let this dictate your actions), here are some of the best times to apply for jobs.

January & February

Believe it or not, one of the best times of the year to apply for a job, regardless of industry, is at the start of the year. January and February are prime hiring times for a few reasons.

Budget Availability

First, it's often the start of the fiscal year for many companies. While fiscal years can begin during any quarter, the beginning of the year is usually when budgets are sorted and ready for use. Organizations understand their hiring budget and can start taking full advantage of it!

There's less hesitation about bringing in new employees because the budget is intact. If you were to try and get a job later in the year, the companies you interview for might have already consumed a substantial portion of the budget. Therefore, there will be fewer opportunities and more reluctance, especially if the hiring manager is getting close to depleting the available funds.

During the winter season, companies may need to hire people. But because there's uncertainty with the budget, they may implement hiring freezes. Come January and February, personnel requirements become more apparent as budgets free up, resulting in a push for increased hiring activity.

Many organizations have a backlog of jobs that are waiting to be fulfilled, making this one of the best times to look for a job.

Job Openings

There's also the factor of job openings. Providing bonuses in December is common, so many people wait until January to resign and look for another opportunity. That results in more positions opening up.

Everyone Is Back From Vacation

January and February are also good times to apply for jobs because most employees are back in the office. As you know, November and December are prime vacation months. Business operations slow down, and more people take time off work to travel or visit family for the holidays.

Everyone will start to return to the office during the first week of January as the new year picks up. By the second or third week, business is back in full swing! Fewer people are out, resulting in the reliable presence of key decision-makers.

It's the perfect time for hiring managers to bring people in because there's less back-and-forth with out-of-office staff. The ones making hiring choices are all there, resulting in fewer delays and faster decisions.

March, April, & May

While January and February are definitely the best times to apply for a job, many see success during the spring season. It's also when you have the most competition! Upcoming college grads usually start to search for employment after graduation during this time.

Depending on the job you are looking for and the industry, this time of the year may or may not work in your favor.

Here's why:

A New Batch Of Potential Employees

Some companies specifically wait until the spring season to start hiring for entry-level jobs. They know the candidate pool will be plentiful as soon-to-be graduates enter the workforce. As a result, they may hold off on hiring for certain jobs until that time.

Momentum From January & February

Another reason March, April, and May are good months to apply for jobs is that they piggyback on the momentum from January and February. Hiring processes take a long time. Depending on the job, it might take multiple rounds of interviews and several months. Therefore, hiring managers can't go through their list of job openings at once.

Companies on a substantial hiring spree may extend that cycle well into spring.

Summer Is Looming

You must also consider the pressure organizations feel as the spring season looms to a close. What's after spring? The summer! That's when employees often request vacation time.

Summer and holiday seasons are the most-requested periods for vacation. As summertime inches closer, hiring teams feel the pressure to fill all open positions. They know that many people will be out, and they might need to find new employees to fulfill those responsibilities.

While every company operates differently, it's common for hiring activity to remain high at the start of spring. It may dwindle down as those open positions fill, but you can still find plenty of opportunities.

September & October

September and October can be hit or miss, since it all depends on the industry and company. For some organizations, these months can be just as busy as January and February, leading to an influx of open positions.

Hiring picks up during the fall because it's often the last time companies can bring in new people. Hiring activity falls substantially during the summer as people go on vacation. Those who don't take a holiday are often busy with increased business operations, leaving little time to go through the hiring process.

But after hiring managers come back from vacation, a new wave of hiring may occur. All those open spots left unfilled from the beginning of the year must happen during September and October before holiday hiring slowdowns happen.

The good news is that things are often less chaotic during the months of September and October, so it's one of the best times to apply for jobs if you don't like the hassle! Interviews go smoothly, and there's often less downtime. That means less waiting to hear about the next step and shorter times between your last interview and getting a job offer.

Does This Mean You Shouldn't Look or Apply At Other Times?

While the periods mentioned above are the best times to apply for jobs, don't let that stop you from seeking opportunities during other parts of the year. There are no hard and fast rules about hiring processes. Companies seek candidates whenever a position opens, or they need new employees.

That can occur at any point during the year! People quit, organizations expand, and roles change. You never know what openings you'll find.

In other words, there's never a bad time to look for a job.

If you're looking to make a change in your career, don't let the time of the year stop you from exploring your options. Start your job search and see what's available. Apply to positions that interest you and use your network to learn about openings that might be coming up.

If you don't find something that works for your needs, don't fret! Keep the search alive and continue checking the main job search websites. Something will come up eventually, and you should always try to apply as fast as possible.

Getting a job offer can sometimes feel like a numbers game. The more you apply to positions, the better your chances of getting that elusive offer. But it's also about the quality or fit for jobs you apply to. Randomly applying to any job isn't a good idea.

You're more likely to see increased hiring activity during the aforementioned periods. Meanwhile, the summer and early winters tend to be sparse. But that doesn't mean you should pause your job search until those times of the year.

Look now and see what opportunities are on the horizon.

How to Improve Your Chances Year-Round

It doesn't matter whether you're searching during the best times to apply for a job, or when hiring activity slows down. Landing a job involves more than submitting an online application!

Here are some tips to help you maximize your chances of getting a job offer, no matter when you apply.

Make the Most of the Lulls

Don't get discouraged if you have trouble finding open positions that match your career aspirations. That's normal, and it's only a matter of time before things pick up and you begin to see more opportunities to make big career moves. So, what should you do in the meantime?

Lulls in your job search will occur, but you must not grow complacent. Use that downtime to improve yourself and what you have to offer employers.

The worst thing you can do is get discouraged and wait for things to "pick up." As mentioned earlier, job searches can take months. Some people get used to not going to work and end up treating it like a vacation. This isn't time off, and you should never treat it as such.

Always make use of any free time you have.

Consider refreshing your resume. Your resume is one of the most important documents you'll utilize during your job search. There are always ways to improve.

Fine-tune every detail and make it as appealing as possible. You'd be surprised by how much difference a well-written resume can make.

Be sure you update your LinkedIn profile as well. A robust LinkedIn profile is accessible to anyone 24/7.

You can also beef up skills in other ways that can be listed on your resume. For example, you can look into volunteering at events.

If you feel confident with your resume, try learning a new skill. Think about what skills are relevant to your industry and invest in improving your understanding of them. It doesn't matter how proficient you think you are. There's always room to grow.

Focus on core skills, and your improved competencies may lead to a better salary or position.

You can also work on soft skills like time management or communication. Take classes online and read books that help you become the best employee possible.

Try to make the most of your time. It can be disheartening not to find a job right away and feel tempted to wait for "better" times to apply. Keep yourself busy and put that extra time to good use!

Don't Hesitate If You See an Opportunity You Like

Even if it's not one of the best times to apply for a job, it's always a good idea to check on opportunities regularly. Make a habit of viewing job boards, LinkedIn posts, company hiring pages, and more.

Go one step further and set up alerts with your favorite listing sites. They can notify you of new jobs that meet the parameters you set. You'll be one of the first to know when something comes up.

When you see an opportunity you like, don't hesitate to pounce! Apply for those jobs as quickly as possible. Hiring managers may pay closer attention to the first few applications that come in. If they see what they like, you may find yourself getting phone interviews far sooner than you thought.

Act fast and jump on opportunities that seem like the right fit. It doesn't matter what time of the year it is. Applying quickly may increase your chances of getting through the hiring process.

Conclusion

Now you know the best times to apply for jobs. However, you should also know that there's no bad time to look for a new opportunity!

While understanding the cyclical nature of the hiring process can be helpful, never let that stop you from being proactive. There are plenty of jobs out there, all it takes is some commitment and patience to land one!

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Best of 2023: Top Veteran Resources of the Year

By Mike Richman | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

Every week, VA sends a newsletter that is jam-packed with resources like free concert tickets, farming assistance, workout programs, national park passes and Veteran discounts on hundreds of services.

VA makes no endorsements of the privately offered resources, but we share them to generate awareness of all that's available to the Veteran community.

Here are the Top 10 most popular Veteran resources from 2023:

2023 Veterans Day retail discounts, free meals and other offers

On Veterans Day 2023, Veterans and their families, caregivers and survivors had access to hundreds of free meals, discounts and other freebies. Click here to see a long list of discounts available year-round.

Veterans set to see cost-of-living increase to their benefits

On June 14, 2023, President Biden signed into law the Veterans Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) Act of 2023. The law directs VA to provide a cost-of-living adjustment for Veterans' benefits in 2024 equal to the COLA applied to Social Security benefits, as determined by the Social Security Administration.

Veterans, Gold Star Families get free lifetime pass to national parks, wildlife refuges, other public lands

The U.S. National Park Service offers a lifetime pass that provides free entrance to national parks for Veterans and their families. The pass gives them free access to about 2,000 public locations spread out across more than 400 million acres of public lands.

Exploring resort, hotel deals through the Armed Forces Vacation Club for Veterans

For Veterans who have served our nation with dedication and sacrifice, finding opportunities to relax and rejuvenate is essential. The Armed Forces Vacation Club is a valuable resource that offers a chance for Veterans to enjoy well-deserved vacations without breaking the bank.

Your VA ID Card is the proof you need for discounts

"How do I prove that I'm a Veteran?" That question is often asked by those who once served in the military. First, you'll want to apply for VA's Veteran ID Card (VIC), a digital photo ID you can use to take advantage of the many discounts offered by businesses, including restaurants, hotels, stores and recreational activities, among other perks.

200 remote jobs from Veteran friendly employers

Working from home offers Veterans and their families the flexibility they need to carry out their job responsibilities. This article provides a long list of military friendly companies that are offering more than 200 remote jobs, including big corporate names like Amazon, AT&T, American Express, Enterprise, Hilton and Xerox.

Experience live events through Vet Tix with friends and family

Vet Tix is a national nonprofit group that provides free tickets to Veterans and service members for live events, including concerts, sports, performing arts and family-themed events. You can become a VetTixer by creating an account for free at Vettix.org.

Learn to golf from the pros with PGA HOPE

PGA HOPE—Helping Our Patriots Everywhere—is introducing and teaching golf to Veterans and active-duty military to enhance their physical, mental, social and emotional well-being. Free to Veterans and service members, PGA HOPE programs are available in 47 states at more than 340 locations.

Find your Veterans Day events

November marks National Veteran and Military Families Month, highlighted by Veterans Day on Nov. 11. This list of Veterans Day and Veterans Month events, organized by state, highlighted hundreds of free events in November 2023 that honored those who served.

In tax season, how can Veterans maximize their tax benefits?

Veterans may be eligible for certain tax benefits under the tax code. This article summarizes some of the key federal and state tax benefits for Veterans provided by accountant and tax expert Lisa Greene-Lewis of TurboTax.

If you don't receive the #VetResources weekly newsletter, sign up today at VA.gov/VetResources. Past newsletters can be found here, and all #VetResources blog posts are online at news.va.gov/category/vets-experience/vetresources.

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Good Hobbies & Interests To Put On A Resume In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Figuring out what hobbies and interests to put on a resume can be tricky. Not only is it wise to choose some that you can relate to the job, but it's not always clear where you should put this section in the first place!

This guide will help you choose some good interests to put on a resume if you're serious about getting hired.

When You Should Consider Putting Interests & Hobbies on Your Resume

Whether or not you put an "interests and hobbies" section in your resume depends on a few factors. There's no perfect rule for this, and what you should do depends on your experience and the job you're trying to land.

Typically, it's wise to leave this section out of your resume if you're a professional with many years of experience. Focusing on your skills, work experience, and certifications is better in those instances. Those details will provide plenty of insight and take enough room on your resume to make it stand out.

It's also wise to leave off hobbies and interests if you have a relatively long resume. Resumes should be short and to the point. Most recommend that these documents be one or two pages long.

If you already have enough material to paint a compelling picture of your qualifications with a single page, you can leave out your hobbies and interests.

So, when should you include this information on your resume?

Including hobbies and interests will benefit recent graduates with little work experience.

When you don't have much work history to provide, including a section about your interests is a great way to stand out among other candidates. It can give hiring managers more insight into who you are and what unique skills you can bring to the position.

While hobbies and interests usually occur outside the workplace, plenty could apply to your desired job. Talking about interests also works in your favor when they relate to the company or position. Think of it as an opportunity to show transferable skills that the hiring manager may want to see from an employee.

When deciding whether or not to include information about your hobbies and interests, consider what you know about the company. Perform your research, understand the company's values and culture, and see if any of your interests apply. If they do, putting them on your resume can reassure hiring decision-makers that you share similar values or interests.

One final point. If you have an unusual hobby or interest, including it on your resume may help you be more memorable.

Examples of Interests & Hobbies to Put on Your Resume

Of course, not every hobby or interest you have deserves a spot on your resume. If you want to leave an impact on hiring managers, you must choose what hobbies you include.

Here are examples of interests that could work in your favor.

Writing

If you're a writer, whether published or not, consider including it on your resume. This interest puts your communication skills on full display.

Communication is crucial for any position and is one of the most sought-after skills. Seeing something like writing on your resume could significantly boost your chances of moving forward in the hiring process.

It doesn't matter what form your writing takes. Whether you're a published novelist or run a successful blog, it proves that your communication skills go beyond the workplace and in-person interactions. A good communicator is a major asset to any team, and including this hobby on your resume shows you have what it takes to make meaningful contributions.

Volunteering

Hiring managers love to see candidates with volunteering experience. In fact, data shows that managers are more inclined to go with candidates that mention volunteering on their resumes than those who don't.

There are a couple of reasons for this.

First, volunteering shows that you have the commitment to help others. If you've volunteered with organizations that align with the company's values, you're set. Employers like to hire good and kind people, and those with volunteering experience typically fit the mold.

Secondly, volunteering shows initiative. No one is forcing you to take time out of your schedule to do good in the world. Hiring managers often feel that people who take the initiative to volunteer will do the same in the workplace.

Finally, listing your volunteer experience on your resume shows good organizational and leadership skills. Those are both fantastic traits that employers look for when hiring new people.

Travel

Traveling is another great interest to put on your resume. However, you must not overstate your commitment to traveling. Otherwise, hiring managers might worry that you'll request an excessive amount of time off!

Assuming you do this, this hobby could work in your favor for a few reasons.

The first is that it implies that you're adaptable and unafraid to step out of your comfort zone. If you love to visit new destinations and unfamiliar cultures, you're probably willing to adapt into the new company and adjust your work style.

Traveling also indicates that you're curious about new things. That could benefit you because employers want people who won't hesitate to think outside the box and be innovative.

Putting this interest on your resume can also point to great organizational skills. Traveling can be challenging, and anyone who does it frequently will likely know how to keep their ducks in a row regardless of their surroundings.

Reading

Reading is a lot like writing because it highlights valuable skills employers want from job candidates.

It doesn't matter what genre you prefer. Reading provides mental stimulation and exercises the brain. People who read often usually have a wealth of general knowledge and know how to focus on a variety of tasks that are put in front of them.

Reading can also boost your communication and comprehension skills.

Music

Music seems like a broad interest to include. But whether you love making it or simply listening to your favorite artists, it's a good interest to put on your resume.

When you enjoy listening to music, you benefit from good stress management. Music often makes people happier, leading to less anxiety in the workplace.

Plus, it strengthens your learning skills and abilities to memorize fine details. With how much the work environment changes, showing that you're eager to learn can make all the difference.

If you like to make music, you bring many relevant workplace skills. Making music requires creative thinking, determination, and a willingness to work hard to get things right. Those are traits that employers love to see.

Photography

Photography is more than snapping photos on your smartphone! It's a real art form that taps into many unique capabilities.

When you compose the perfect shot, you bring a concept to life while harnessing your technical skills. Those traits are relevant to many positions.

It's also a creative hobby employers love to see for jobs requiring out-of-the-box thinking. Pair that with the interpersonal skills required to be a successful photographer, and this interest can paint a positive picture of your character.

Sports & Exercise

Sports, exercise, and activities that promote general physical wellness are all great interests to put on a resume.

If you play sports, specify what you play and in what context. For example, do you play on an official team? This distinction matters because team sports can point to many relevant workplace skills.

When you play as part of a team, you must master communication and interpersonal skills. There are also moments to flex your leadership capabilities and collaborate with others. Those traits all apply to jobs in various fields.

Even if you don't play sports, you can provide details about exercise and physical fitness.

Staying fit and active requires self-discipline. It's also a masterclass in patience, seeing results, and bouncing back after disappointment. You say a lot about your personality when you include sports and exercise on your resume, and they're all good things that employers want out of new hires.

Outdoor Recreation

Outdoor activities can include a myriad of things. For example, you might enjoy long hikes on the weekend or camping excursions a few times a year. Even something you can do in your backyard, such as gardening, applies.

This is a good interest to put on your resume because it shows you're well-balanced.

While employers like to see people showing dedication in the workplace, they understand the importance of having a healthy work-life balance. When employees put all their focus on work, they can experience too much anxiety and face the risk of burnout.

Spending time outdoors is a great way to unwind. Having it as your hobby indicates that you understand how to achieve that all-so-important balance, separating your work and personal life to achieve better mental and physical health.

Dance

Dancing is a combination of physical exercise and artistic skills like music. You get the best of both worlds and including this hobby on your resume puts this all on display.

Dancing is a great way to alleviate the workday's stress, showing that you can maintain a healthy work-life balance. It's also inherently collaborative. Don't be afraid to mention the type of dance you do to give hiring managers a better idea of what skills you're bringing to the table.

For example, dancing as part of a troupe shows that you have great collaboration skills. It also highlights your ability to communicate, work with others, and deliver an amazing final product.

Dancing is a complex activity that requires great concentration. Dancers often have higher cognitive performance while flexing their creativity whenever they hit the dance floor.

Making Art

Last but not least, we have the hobby of making art.

This is another general interest you can go into further detail about to help employers learn more. There are many art forms out there, and what type you perform can clarify your unique skill set. For example, you can mention doing still-life paintings or making pottery.

Whatever the case, hiring managers like to see this hobby for a couple of reasons.

The first is that it's the epitome of creative thinking. In the workplace, you may have to think outside the box to come up with unique solutions to everyday problems. If you're in a creative field like marketing, there are transferable skills that directly relate to the job.

Art also requires critical thinking, which can help you in any position. Artists employ their critical thinking skills to make thoughtful decisions about their work. That can benefit you in the workplace, no matter what industry you're in.

The creativity you tap into while making art also points to difficult-to-learn traits like inventiveness, imagination, and problem-solving. While people can develop those skills over time, employers often prefer to bring creative people in to harness those skills from day one.

The Right Way to List Interests & Hobbies on a Resume

Knowing what hobbies and interests to put on your resume is only half the battle. There's a right and wrong way to include them.

What you don't want to do is make this section overshadow the rest of your qualifications. While hobbies can paint a picture of what you'll bring to the company, hiring managers will prioritize your skills, experiences, and qualifications. Putting interests at the forefront isn't a good look.

It goes against standard practices and may even frustrate hiring managers wanting to get to the core of their qualifications. Some employers may think that putting interests and hobbies at the forefront means that you're trying to mask the fact that you don't fit the job requirements.

Think of your hobbies and interests as more of a supplement. They shouldn't be the main focus, but they can add a little extra value to your resume if needed.

Formatting Tips

Adding a section for hobbies and interests is easy.

Create a separate section titled "Hobbies" or "Interests." You can also call it "Personal Interests" or another variation.

Whatever you decide to call it, move this section down to the bottom of the resume. It should come after contact information, work experience, and education. This section should never trump those important details.

When it comes to formatting, simplicity is best. How much information you provide depends on what you want to say about the hobby and how lengthy your resume already is. If it's packed to the brim with information, it's generally better to keep it straightforward by listing each hobby or interest with a bullet point.

You can provide additional details if you need to use this section to compensate for your lack of professional work experience. Keep the bullet points but add a brief one-line description.

In this description, you can offer additional details. Focus on your achievements with the hobby.

If possible, quantify the interest with a number. For example, you can include how many hours you've put in, how many shows you've competed in, first-place positions in competitions you've won, etc. Quantifying the hobby adds credibility and makes this section more scannable.

Don't go over the top with the hobbies and interest section. These additional details can help you get further in the hiring process, but they can also work against you if you focus too much on your interests. Keep it short and scannable.

The Value of Choosing Interests That Relate to the Job You Want

Before you consider putting interests and hobbies on your resume, think about how they relate to the job. Listing a few unrelated off-hours activities doesn't provide much value.

If you want this section in your resume to benefit your chances of moving forward in the hiring process, the best thing you can do is choose interests that relate to the job in some way. When you do that, you're proving to hiring managers that you're a better fit for the job. It goes beyond basic qualifications and shows that your true passions can help you see success in the role.

For example, say that your favorite hobby is creating digital art in your spare time. If you're applying for an ultra-technical job like accounting, where art isn't needed to succeed, that tidbit of information can show that you bring critical thinking to the table. However, it doesn't say anything about your actual work performance and what you have to offer.

However, the hobby is directly transferable if you're applying for something like a job in digital marketing. A hiring manager would see that and think you have unique skills that can help the company from day one.

Research the organization, read the job description thoroughly, and learn more about the company's culture. Use that information to connect the dots to your relevant hobbies. Your research will help you understand what employers want out of job candidates, empowering you to tailor your resume perfectly.

Conclusion

Now that you know some good interests to put on a resume, it's time to brainstorm which ones apply to you. Once you have some candidates, pick ones that relate to the job you want.

While it's not always the right move to include your hobbies on a resume, doing it properly can benefit you!

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Get a great job through American Corporate Partners

By American Corporate Partners | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

In 2023, a record number of post-9/11 Veterans found meaningful employment with a mentor's assistance — for free — from American Corporate Partners (ACP), a national nonprofit organization. The average starting salary was $93,000. ACP will help Veterans find a new position, get promoted and grow their civilian network.

ACP helps post-9/11 Veterans find meaningful employment after the military. Whether Veterans are looking for a higher-paying job or seeking a promotion, ACP mentors coach Veterans toward great careers. More than 30,000 Veterans have found success through ACP since 2010.

How to get started

Visit acp-usa.org and fill out a short online application. Answer questions about your career goals, military experience and mentoring preferences.

What to expect after applying?

  • ACP will reach out within 24 hours and schedule a 15-minute phone call to ask a few more questions to match each Veteran with the right mentor.
  • ACP will introduce you to a mentor within several weeks of your application to the program and will check in throughout the year to provide customized resources and ensure positive outcomes. Ninety-eight percent of Veterans would recommend ACP.
  • All post-9/11 Veterans who have served at least 180 days of active duty since 9/11 are eligible.
  • ACP's weekly LinkedIn Live series connects Veterans directly to partner companies and hiring managers.
  • ACP's LinkedIn Group, ACP Connects, offers employment opportunities from military-ready employers and professional development resources.

Apply Now at acp-usa.org/mentoring-program/veteran-application.

ACP will hand-pick a mentor based on your career interests and professional history. You and your mentor will create a tailored action plan for the mentorship and speak monthly to make progress on your goals. ACP staff will help guide you through the mentorship experience to ensure success.

Whether you are actively searching for a new career or are newly employed and looking for advice about how to succeed in your new role and advance, ACP's customized program is designed to assist you on your path toward rewarding, meaningful employment.

Typical mentorship topics include:

  • Resume review and interview preparation
  • Career exploration
  • Work-life balance
  • Networking
  • Small business development
  • Leadership and professional communication

ACP's staff personally pairs every applicant, hand-picking a mentor for each protégé based on career compatibility, experience level, location and personal interests. Every mentor and protégé has a phone call with an ACP staff member to communicate preferences, which are considered during the pairing process. Join our free, personalized career mentorship program and experience a year-long mentorship to assist you with your civilian career goals at acp-usa.org.

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