How To Answer "Why Did You Choose This Job?" Effectively

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"Why did you choose this job?" is an incredibly common interview question that you must be prepared to answer. This guide will teach you everything you need to know, so you can make a great impression and land the job you want. Why This Question Gets Asked. There are several reasons why this question comes up during interviews. The first is out of sheer curiosity! It doesn't matter what type of job you're trying to land. Hiring managers are often eager to learn more about what led you to this moment. They want more insight into why you chose this particular field and this job opportunity. This information can be useful internally, helping hiring teams in the future. It can also help hiring managers see if you'll fit the company and its culture well. Beyond that, interviewers ask "Why did you choose this job? to gauge your genuine interest in the position and understand your motivations. Hiring new employees isn't an easy or cheap endeavor. Companies put significant resou...... Read more

Podcast-hosting web platform specializes in 'Giving Veterans a Voice'

By Mike Richman | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

In 2004, shortly after the start of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, a Humvee driven by Army combat engineer Joel Hunt was hit by a roadside bomb in the city of Tikrit. The blast rattled Hunt and caused a brain injury that has left lingering effects, such as speech impairment, double vision and numbness in his left leg. He's struggled at times to regain his footing and find his place in society. For that reason, Hunt is reaching out to other Veterans who are also confronting health-related challenges, namely PTSD and traumatic brain injury. He's the executive director of Military Broadcast Radio (MBR), a podcast-hosting web platform that specializes in "giving Veterans a voice" by allowing them to host talk and music shows. 'This is the best rehabilitation'. In Hunt's view, the shows serve as form of therapy for the Veterans who play music and lead conversations on topics of interest to the Veteran community... Read more

"What Is Your Philosophy Towards Work?" Tips & Examples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"What is your philosophy towards work?" is an interview question that many people aren't prepared to answer. But the ones that are will impress a potential employer. This article will cover how to come up with a great answer to this question and discuss your work philosophy in a way that's honest and effective. The Reason Interviewers Ask This Question. Questions like this give hiring managers more insight into candidates' values and work ethic. Your philosophy towards work says a lot about who you are as a person and what values you'll bring to a company. Everyone has unique experiences throughout their job history, and you'll go through many moments that shape your outlook and philosophy towards work. Asking this question gives employers an opportunity to see how you'd act on the job and to test if you're a good fit. After all, you might have the qualifications and education required for the role, but will your philosophy hinder or help your ability to thrive?... Read more

Physical fitness resources to ignite a healthier future

By Christopher McAllister | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

Staying physically fit after serving in the military is essential for Veterans. It supports overall health and mental well-being, and can help with the transition to civilian life. Regular exercise provides a sense of routine and discipline, which helps with adaptation outside the military environment. Fitness contributes to long-term health, helps manage stress and improves overall quality of life. If you have disabilities, physical activity can be adapted to your abilities. Adaptive exercises can improve mobility, strength and mental well-being. It's important to consult with your primary care doctor or health team to develop a personalized fitness plan that accommodates your specific needs and challenges. Remember, your fitness journey is unique to you. Here are some popular fitness resources for Veterans to get started on the road to a happy, healthy you:... Read more

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How To Answer "Why Did You Choose This Job?" Effectively

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"Why did you choose this job?" is an incredibly common interview question that you must be prepared to answer.

This guide will teach you everything you need to know, so you can make a great impression and land the job you want.

Why This Question Gets Asked

There are several reasons why this question comes up during interviews. The first is out of sheer curiosity! It doesn't matter what type of job you're trying to land. Hiring managers are often eager to learn more about what led you to this moment.

They want more insight into why you chose this particular field and this job opportunity. This information can be useful internally, helping hiring teams in the future. It can also help hiring managers see if you'll fit the company and its culture well.

Beyond that, interviewers ask "Why did you choose this job? to gauge your genuine interest in the position and understand your motivations. Hiring new employees isn't an easy or cheap endeavor. Companies put significant resources into the process, and it's often a time-intensive journey to find the right person to fill every role.

Hiring managers want to ensure that what the company puts into this search is a smart investment in the organization's long-term success. Employers don't want people who are clearly just there for the money. Nor do they want individuals who are only mildly interested in the role

They want someone truly interested in the role because that typically translates to high productivity and good employee retention. If you're not invested in the job, there's a higher risk that you'll head to greener pastures when the going gets tough. That's not what companies want or need, so interviewers ask this question to learn more about your intrinsic motivations outside of a paycheck.

Your answer will let help hiring managers understand if you'll be happy in the role and do your best to succeed.

How to Answer "Why Did You Choose This Job?"

Interview questions like this may seem straightforward. But your answer holds more weight than most realize, unveiling critical information about your potential in the job. The quality of your response matters.

Here are a few tips to develop a great answer that leaves a lasting impression.

Learn About the Position and Company

The first thing you should do is research the company and the job. This step is paramount for any job you apply to. You can't respond thoughtfully if you know little about what you're getting into! Job descriptions alone aren't enough to give you the information you need.

Perform in-depth research about the company, its history and what it does. Learn about its position within the industry and its impact. You can turn to the company's official website and social media pages.

If possible, connect with current employees to learn as much as possible. Then, do the same about the position itself. Research the role, how it affects the company's bottom line, what a typical day looks like, etc.

Research is useful for many reasons. First, it helps you learn more about the company you're applying to and the job itself. Take what you've learned and consider if this job truly interests you.

Secondly, you can use what you learned during your research to show interviewers that you're familiar with the company. That alone can be impressive because it shows you're invested in the organization and the opportunity.

Furthermore, that research can help you develop a solid answer. Use what you learned about the company's goals and values. Connect them to your own, and you can provide several compelling reasons why you chose this opportunity to pursue.

Make it Clear That You're Qualified

While many assume that answering "Why did you choose this job?" focuses solely on motivations and values, you can also use it to show off your qualifications. It's important to take every opportunity to reiterate that you're wholly qualified to fill the role.

You can do this in many ways, but one of the best is to reflect on your past experiences that got you to this point. For example, say that you have a degree in this field, and the position is the next natural step in your career. Approach the answer by bringing up your past education and work experience.

You could mention that you have a degree in this field, explaining why you chose to pursue it and are passionate about it. Segway into how your career has evolved, and you can drop tidbits of information about the relevant experience that makes you qualified for the job.

Get creative and be proud of your accomplishments! Don't go overboard with your qualifications, but don't shy away from mentioning them, either. They could help you get a job offer.

Connect the Job With Your Goals

Another great way to answer this question is to connect it to your larger career goals. This approach can be tricky, so plan what you want to say well before your interview.

The last thing you want to do is give the impression that this position is merely a stepping stone. That's a huge red flag because it makes hiring managers worry that you'll leave the first opportunity you have. Choose your words wisely!

Focus instead on how this position will help you reach your long-term goals. For example, you can mention how the experiences and skills you'll gain working for the company will be integral to becoming a high-level executive in your field.

Remember to reiterate how passionate you are about the job and the company. Consider expressing your excitement about working at this company and avoid making it sound like the job is transitory. Emphasize precisely how this role will help you learn and grow.

Bringing up your long-term goals is a fantastic way to show that you're in it for the long hall. It proves your motivations go beyond a paycheck and reassures hiring managers that you'll work hard to succeed.

Show Your Enthusiasm

Our last tip is an easy one: Be enthusiastic!

Many people assume that job interviews need to be stuffy, formal events. While you must maintain a high degree of professionalism at all times, that doesn't mean you can't show excitement about the opportunity.

Enthusiasm can take you a long way. When an interviewer clearly sees that you're passionate and excited about the job, there's no question that you'll do your best to succeed. It can even show that you'll be a joy to work with (which makes all the difference).

Reiterate your interest, and don't be afraid to bring up what excites you most about the job. For example, maybe there are facets of the job that you truly love. Talk about them! Let interviewers know why you're eager to get started; That enthusiasm can push you to the top of the candidate list.

Sample Answers

Your response should be unique to your experiences and motivations. But we have a few examples to inspire and guide you in the right direction.

Sample 1

Our first sample answer comes from a candidate who identifies with the company's culture. This response works well because it's a low-key form of flattery. More importantly, it focuses on the company culture.

The candidate's response reassures the interviewer that they will do everything they can to succeed and make the most out of their time with the company.

"One of the most significant things that drew me to this job is your company's reputation. Not only is your organization well-known throughout the United States, but your presence locally is something I've always admired. Your company's participation and sponsorship of the annual 5K raise that raises awareness for cancer research is amazing.

As someone with a parent who passed from cancer, it's a cause that's important to me. Working for a company with values like that would be fantastic. Pair that with your organization's long history of success in this industry, and it felt like a match made in heaven for me."

Sample 2

Our second example leans more on real-world work experience and qualifications. The candidate seeks a leadership position in customer service and uses their response to highlight their education and work history.

"I chose to pursue this job because of my success and passion for helping others while making a real difference. I firmly believe that a company's success hinges on the experience it delivers to customers. I've been working in customer service since I was a teenager.

My first job was in customer service, and my experience there led me to pursue a degree in business administration. That's helped me deliver even better customer service, and I've played a big part in reshaping customer relationship management in my previous roles.

Your organization is well-known for delivering top-notch customer service, and I'm eager to become a part of that while doing what I can to elevate things even more."

Sample 3

Our final example is from a candidate who's changing careers. If you're in this boat, answering a question like this can be tricky. The key is to focus on your motivations and highlight past experiences relevant to this new job.

The candidate in this example does a fine job of showing what motivates them and proving they'll be an asset to the company.

"For several years, I've worked as a data analyst. As you can likely see from my resume, this is my first time pursuing marketing. I decided to make the career change after realizing that my passion for data analysis revolved around how teams used that data to connect with customers.

The scientific side of data analysis was less interesting to me than the application of my work. I decided to get more involved with my previous company's marketing efforts and realized I had a knack for it. My ability to interpret and apply data gives me a unique edge over other marketing professionals.

I've spent the last year filling skill gaps in marketing, and I believe I'm ready to transition into marketing full-time. This opportunity is a great match for me because of your company's data-driven approach to marketing. I'm eager to apply my skills as a data analyst while diving head-first into the marketing world!"

Conclusion

Talking about why you chose a particular job doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, the recommendations above are actually rather simple!

Do some research, spend some time preparing your answer, and you'll do just fine.

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Podcast-hosting web platform specializes in 'Giving Veterans a Voice'

By Mike Richman | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

In 2004, shortly after the start of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, a Humvee driven by Army combat engineer Joel Hunt was hit by a roadside bomb in the city of Tikrit. The blast rattled Hunt and caused a brain injury that has left lingering effects, such as speech impairment, double vision and numbness in his left leg.

He's struggled at times to regain his footing and find his place in society.

For that reason, Hunt is reaching out to other Veterans who are also confronting health-related challenges, namely PTSD and traumatic brain injury. He's the executive director of Military Broadcast Radio (MBR), a podcast-hosting web platform that specializes in "giving Veterans a voice" by allowing them to host talk and music shows.

'This is the best rehabilitation'

In Hunt's view, the shows serve as form of therapy for the Veterans who play music and lead conversations on topics of interest to the Veteran community. Nearly 13 shows now air on MBR, including two produced by Hunt: "The Revel Experience" and "The Blaque Surga Show." These podcasts provide their audiences with music of different genres, the latest world and entertainment news and helpful tips on the everyday life of Veterans, active-duty personnel and civilians.

"The truth is the only way you're going to stop suicide is if you bring Veterans to Veterans to talk to each other, because some of the guys that we battled and deployed with don't have families," Hunt said. "Maybe their mom passed away, maybe their dad passed away. Unfortunately, not everybody likes to post their whole life on Facebook. So if you don't get to know the Veteran, and you don't know what's going on in their life, and they commit suicide, it's because we didn't do enough to reach out before we got to that point. I believe that with a microphone and sharing their stories and talking to other Veterans and being inspired by stories, I honestly think this is the best rehabilitation."

Brandon Stokley, who played 15 seasons in the NFL for five teams as a wide receiver, is a spokesperson for Military Broadcast Radio.

"I support the ultimate vision of putting our military Veterans to work from home as a DJ," he said on MBR's website. "Music is very therapeutic and can be healing. Having one DJ will give them a purpose for others and themselves. I am proud to be a spokesperson for a station, such as MBR, that is 'Giving Veterans a Voice.'"

Jim Butler first launched Military Broadcast Radio in 2015 while serving in the Air Force. After returning from the paralympics in 2015, he met up with Butler, inquired about hosting his own podcast and received the go-ahead. He had graduated with honors from the Colorado Media School in Denver and was familiar with the broadcasting industry.

Hunt took over the station in 2018 and established it as a non-profit organization. He's now the executive director of Military Broadcast Radio.

"I said if I'm going to take it over, I'm going to create it as a non-profit," Hunt said. "I don't just want to be a radio station. I want to create a program that helps Veterans buy the equipment so they can be DJs and host talk shows from the comfort of their house. I gave [MBR] the tagline 'Giving Veterans a Voice' because I believe that those who fought for this country should be those that get that voice. There are so many programs out there that want to help Veterans. MBR does its part to get the word out there even more. I have future visions for this nonprofit."

Veterans are trained to host their own podcasts

Hunt and his staff teach the hosts how to use the equipment, such as the live webinar platform StreamYard, and explain how to run a show from their desktop, iPhone and mixer. After a few months of training, Veterans are ready to host their own podcast. Military Broadcast Radio has a studio in downtown Denver that the hosts can also access to broadcast their shows if they prefer.

Marine Veteran Travis Partington hosts "Oscar Mike Radio", which airs on MBR and focuses on real-life stories of active-duty military and Veterans. He has nothing but praise for how Hunt manages the station.

"The best thing about Military Broadcast Radio is a host can be new or experienced and have a place on the network," Partington said. "Joel can get you started easily. If you have more experience like me, he lets me be me and will make suggestions from time to time to improve.

"What I have learned from Joel being on Military Broadcast Radio is how much effort it takes to manage multiple hosts and systems all at the same time," he added. "As a host, I only have my show to worry about. But Joel has to make sure everyone's show is set and aligns to that standard he has for Military Broadcast Radio. This has opened my eyes to a whole different side of things, and I have looked for ways for Oscar Mike Radio better to not make more work for Joel. All in all, it has been a positive experience, and I would encourage anyone to check out MBR's amazing list of Veteran hosts and shows!"

In addition to MBR's web site, the shows air on social media, including Facebook and Twitter (X). Military Broadcast Radio also has a phone app so listeners can follow the stream. Hunt instructs his hosts to air at least one of the public service announcements (PSAs) produced by VA's radio outreach program during their show. Those PSAs are aimed at educating Veterans on important programs, services and benefits.

"A lot of Veterans are out there who we don't think might want to do a podcast," Hunt said. "They're homeless or they live in a low-budget apartment and can hear the person in the other room. It's like cardboard walls. So I'm just trying to give every Veteran that opportunity to be heard because you never know. They could be that one Veteran who really speaks to people."

How to sign up for free training or to host a show on Military Broadcast Radio

Those interested in free training or in hosting a show on Military Broadcast Radio can contact the station or email Joel Hunt directly at manager@mbradio.us.

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"What Is Your Philosophy Towards Work?" Tips & Examples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

"What is your philosophy towards work?" is an interview question that many people aren't prepared to answer. But the ones that are will impress a potential employer.

This article will cover how to come up with a great answer to this question and discuss your work philosophy in a way that's honest and effective.

The Reason Interviewers Ask This Question

Questions like this give hiring managers more insight into candidates' values and work ethic.

Your philosophy towards work says a lot about who you are as a person and what values you'll bring to a company. Everyone has unique experiences throughout their job history, and you'll go through many moments that shape your outlook and philosophy towards work. Asking this question gives employers an opportunity to see how you'd act on the job and to test if you're a good fit.

After all, you might have the qualifications and education required for the role, but will your philosophy hinder or help your ability to thrive?

That's ultimately what hiring managers want to know. What interviewers are looking for may vary based on the type of person they seek. For instance, they may want a candidate who's a go-getter and takes the initiative to go above and beyond what the role entails. Or, they may be primarily concerned with finding someone who can contribute to an existing team dynamic immediately.

Whatever the case, your answer matters. That's why giving this question the ample thought it deserves before your interview is important.

BONUS: Thinking about your answer to this question, even if it isn't asked, will give you information you may decide will be helpful for the employer to know. You could include it in your "tell me about yourself" answer or maybe it will help you develop a STAR story you know you want to use to address what the company says they are looking for in the job announcement.

How to Answer "What is Your Philosophy Towards Work?

"What is your philosophy towards work?" is an interview question that will have a big impact on your chance of getting a job offer. A good response will help you move toward the front of the pack. On the other hand, answers that fall short will do the opposite.

Follow these tips to deliver a response that works in your favor.

Consider Your Goals and Motivations

The first thing you should do when preparing an answer is to reflect on your goals and motivations. What do you want to achieve from this job, and what motivated you to pursue this path? Consider what matters most to you when searching for jobs.

Most people don't give much thought to their philosophies about work, so you'll need to reflect to figure out where you stand. Start with what motivates you to succeed.

For some people, the primary driver is financial. In those cases, your values about work may revolve around doing a fantastic job so that you can continue supporting the lifestyle you have. Therefore, the motivation you demonstrate to a hiring manager would be to put your best foot forward to excel at everything you do.

Conversely, there could be aspects of the job that you're passionate about. For instance, you might enjoy helping others, learning more about the technical skills you employ, or pushing yourself to obtain as much knowledge about your industry as possible.

Think about your goals and what pushes you to pursue greatness in your career. Use that as your foundation for your philosophy towards work, and you can develop a knockout answer that impresses interviewers.

Reflect on What Made You Interested in This Position

Next, consider what encouraged you to apply for this position. When exploring your work philosophy, understanding why you decided to pursue a particular industry, company or position can shed more light on what you value most.

Reflect on what made you think, "That's the job for me!" Was it the type of work you'd do in this position and the impact your job would have? Was it because you enjoy the company and what they do?

Explore all those facets of your job search. Knowing why you chose to pursue this position can help you frame your work philosophy in a way that shows hiring managers that you're the person they're looking for.

Research the Company

Another way to prepare a solid answer is to do your due diligence about the company. Researching your potential employers is always important before an interview. You want to know everything you can about the business to show that you care about landing this opportunity.

But for multi-faceted questions like this, your research can unveil information that helps you develop an answer that works.

There are countless resources available to perform company research. You can head to the official corporate website, social media pages, or Glassdoor. Reviewing the job posting for additional clues about what hiring managers want is also wise. If you wish to gain an insider perspective, you can reach out to current employees, too.

Your goal during research should be to understand the company's values. Every business has corporate values and a distinct company culture. Hiring managers always consider how candidates fit the already established mold, and you can use your answer to this question to show that you're the perfect fit.

Your research can also uncover what the company expects from employees. It's a chance to learn more about the type of people they want to hire. For example, you might discover that the company is people-driven, providing goods or services that make a difference in the lives of real people. In that case, your answer could emphasize the importance of impacting lives in your work.

Learn as much as possible about the company's goals, values, and philosophies. Your response doesn't have to match the company's to a tee, but you can use it as inspiration to ensure your response piques the interviewer's interest.

Be Sincere

After your research, you may feel tempted to create a reworded philosophy that perfectly matches what you learn about the company's values. However, you should avoid reciting anything that sounds too close to what you uncover. Your goal is to be sincere, not fake.

The problem with molding your response too closely to a company's mission statement or corporate value page is that it comes off as inauthentic. Hiring managers know that questions like this often stump candidates, and they understand that people will do their research to make themselves as competitive as possible. They've seen every trick in the book and often see right through inauthentic responses!

Be sincere and discuss your work philosophy from a place of honesty. Employers appreciate honesty and integrity more than anything. Even if your values don't align with the company's perfectly, your sincerity may be enough to win decision-makers over.

Plus, you don't want to get caught up in a lie. Hiring managers can always contact previous employers and references. If what they say doesn't match the philosophy you portray, you could ruin your chances of moving forward.

You can still deliver a thought-provoking response with everything interviewers want to hear. However, you need to lean on honesty and ensure you confidently deliver your answer!

Keep Your Answer Positive

Our final tip is an easy one: Keep things positive!

Let's face it: Past work experiences can make people jaded. Some job-seekers see employment as nothing but a means to a paycheck, and not everyone is interested in going above and beyond when they don't have to.

That's alright, but you shouldn't mention that in your response. Saying something too negative could reflect poorly on your candidacy. No company wants to hire someone with a negative philosophy about work. They want people who will love their job, enjoy being at the company, and actively contribute to the bottom line.

Being too negative has the opposite effect you want, so keep things light.

Never bad-mouth former employers or colleagues. Instead, focus on the strong relationships you've built in your past and the experiences that keep you going in this field. Emphasize your intrinsic motivations and what you love about your career. Leave the negativity at home!

Example Answers

Your response should be unique to your values and experiences. But we have a few examples to inspire you.

Example 1

The first comes from a candidate seeking a sales position. They use their knowledge of the company to connect their values to the business and how it serves customers. This response works well because it shows the hiring managers what's important to the candidate and how they'll use their motivations to push them to excel.

"My philosophy towards work is twofold. First, I always strive to do something that I love. I believe that work is and should be an integral part of one's life, so I always pursue jobs I feel good about doing.

Secondly, I seek jobs that allow me to pursue my most important position: that of a parent. This position is a perfect match for me in many ways.

I genuinely enjoy sales, and the unique nature of the job allows me to work without sacrificing time with my family. I can pursue success while still having room to be a parent.

I particularly love your organization and its family-focused values. I'm a long-time patron of your company and would love to work for a business I can recommend to others. Your products support parents and families, and I'm eager to be a part of that."

Example 2

Our next example is for a candidate pursuing a leadership role as a manager. They use their background to portray a philosophy of professional relationships and teamwork. It's a good response because their values directly correlate with the job's responsibilities, showing they have what it takes to succeed.

"My philosophy is to encourage every employee to value their contributions and find pride in working as a team to develop effective solutions to everyday problems. I strongly believe in company loyalty and the power of developing tight professional relationships. You can't succeed with weak links in the chain, so my goal is to help others find passion in what they do.

No position is less valuable than another, and we all work together to keep the ship running. I love collaborating with people I know well and always work hard to encourage everyone to put their heads together to achieve a common goal. It's what I love to do most, and I know that your company takes great pride in its workforce. I'd love to be part of that empowerment and help others reach their full potential."

Example 3

Our final example can work for any position. It focuses on simple but effective values. It's a great answer because it reassures hiring managers that candidates will work hard to succeed, no matter their challenges.

"My personal values are to put effort into everything I do. I don't believe in doing the bare minimum or just getting by. Since I was in grade school, my philosophy has always been, "If I'm going to do this, I'm going to do it well!"

I believe in putting in consistent hard work and dedication in everything I do. What's the point in doing something if I'm not 100 percent in? I always strive to achieve my goals and make meaningful contributions to the companies I work for. I plan to do the same here if given the opportunity."

Conclusion

Now that you know how to discuss your work philosophy when asked during an interview, it should be pretty clear that this isn't something to worry about.

Simply follow the steps above, and you'll have an answer you can be happy with.

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Physical fitness resources to ignite a healthier future

By Christopher McAllister | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

Staying physically fit after serving in the military is essential for Veterans. It supports overall health and mental well-being, and can help with the transition to civilian life. Regular exercise provides a sense of routine and discipline, which helps with adaptation outside the military environment. Fitness contributes to long-term health, helps manage stress and improves overall quality of life.

If you have disabilities, physical activity can be adapted to your abilities. Adaptive exercises can improve mobility, strength and mental well-being.

It's important to consult with your primary care doctor or health team to develop a personalized fitness plan that accommodates your specific needs and challenges. Remember, your fitness journey is unique to you.

Here are some popular fitness resources for Veterans to get started on the road to a happy, healthy you:

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