33 Questions To Ask Before Accepting A Job Offer In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Many of the best questions to ask before accepting a job offer get skipped by job seekers, causing them frustration later. This list of questions to ask when you've been offered a job will help you understand the situation you're considering stepping into. The more you know, the better! (Plus it may even help you negotiate your offer!) Questions to Ask the Company. You've put in your resume, nailed your interview, and got that elusive job offer: Congratulations! But before you accept the job, there are many things to go over. You want to feel confident in your decision and get all the information you need to enter your first day ready to succeed. Here are some of the best questions to ask before accepting a job. What should be the immediate priorities for me in this role? Your first day can be pretty overwhelming. You're in a brand-new environment trying to learn the ropes. One of the most fundamental questions you can ask is what your priorities will be.... Read more

Stuck in your job? Get free assistance from an American Corporate Partners' career mentor

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Veterans should verify the information with the organization offering. In 2023, a record number of post-9/11 Veterans found meaningful employment with their American Corporate Partner (ACP) Mentor's assistance for free, with an average starting salary of more than $93,000. ACP can help you find a new position, get promoted and grow your civilian network. How to get started. Visit acp-usa.org and fill out a short online application. Answer questions about your career goals, military experience, and mentoring preferences.... Read more

17 Good Questions To Ask A Recruiter In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the best questions to ask recruiters can make your job search simpler and save time for everyone involved. But a lot of job-seekers aren't sure how to approach recruiters when it comes to finding out information about a company or position. Fortunately, we've put together this list of questions to make the process easy. Give it a read before your next talk with a recruiter! Can you provide more information about the interview process? Preparing for what lies ahead in the hiring process is always a good thing. If you're seeking job opportunities from multiple companies, you need to know how to plan your interview strategy. It's also crucial to understand the hiring timeline. For example, some companies will go through several rounds of interviews that could take weeks. Some may even require a security clearance that could take months. All of that information is critical.... Read more

Free farming and beekeeping opportunities for Veterans

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Veterans should verify the information with the organization offering. Many Veterans are finding farming and beekeeping to be therapeutic and meaningful, and this work often comes with a community Veterans can rely on. A variety of free opportunities exclusively for Veterans interested in beekeeping or agricultural programs are listed below. If you know of any other, please list it in the comments so we can include. Farming. U.S. Department of Agriculture Military Veterans Agricultural Liaison. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides financial, educational, or business and training resources through a variety... Read more

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33 Questions To Ask Before Accepting A Job Offer In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Many of the best questions to ask before accepting a job offer get skipped by job seekers, causing them frustration later.

This list of questions to ask when you've been offered a job will help you understand the situation you're considering stepping into. The more you know, the better! (Plus it may even help you negotiate your offer!)

Questions to Ask the Company

You've put in your resume, nailed your interview, and got that elusive job offer: Congratulations! But before you accept the job, there are many things to go over.

You want to feel confident in your decision and get all the information you need to enter your first day ready to succeed. Here are some of the best questions to ask before accepting a job.

What should be the immediate priorities for me in this role?

Your first day can be pretty overwhelming. You're in a brand-new environment trying to learn the ropes. One of the most fundamental questions you can ask is what your priorities will be.

This question when you're offered a job is vital for a couple of different reasons.

First, it gives you a good idea of what you can expect during the first few months of your job. You're getting thrust into a new company with goals and objectives that differ from your last job. The goal here is to understand where your focus should lie.

Secondly, it gives you actionable guidance. The first few days and weeks always involve getting into the swing of things. Knowing what you should be doing can help you find where you fit into the bigger picture and what you can do to contribute to the bottom line.

What are the policies for sick leave and vacation time?

Time-off policies vary from company to company. While some countries have strict laws regarding paid time off and vacations, that's not the case in the United States. As a result, it's important to ask upfront.

Knowing your new company's policies will help you decide if the job is right for you. Plus, it can help you plan for personal time and better understand what to do in unexpected situations.

It can be awkward asking about time off, but there's no better time to clear up confusion than after getting a job offer.

How do employees accrue PTO?

PTO, or paid time-off, is another detail that varies between companies.

Many organizations have strict guidelines about how employees accrue PTO. You may have to work a specific number of hours. Alternatively, they might accrue monthly, quarterly, or annually.

Some companies reward PTO differently based on how long you've worked there. Senior employees might earn more PTO than a new hire over the same accrual period.

Again, those details are unique to your company. Asking this question before accepting a job will make sure there are no surprises later.

Who will I be reporting to?

It's always a good idea to understand team dynamics and where you fit in before accepting a job. You need to know who your immediate supervisor is and how you will contact them.

Some supervisors are more hands-off, making it trickier to get in touch with them. Others are readily available.

Knowing who you will be reporting to can help you get a good feel of the workplace and whether or not you'll be comfortable working there.

What should I expect from the onboarding process?

The onboarding process is a critical piece of the puzzle when you join a new company. Once again, the details of this process can be different from one company to the next.

Some organizations have new hires shadow current employees to learn the ropes. Others invest millions into training programs and classroom-style lectures. In-depth onboarding processes can take several months to go through!

Asking this question before accepting a job offer will help you know what to expect going in. Plus, it gives you insight into what's expected from you moving forward.

Are there any bonuses?

Bonuses are a type of incentive that goes beyond your standard compensation package. Not every company offers bonuses. But if yours does, you want to learn about it upfront.

Asking this question might feel awkward or pushy, but it can help you decide if the job is right for you. For example, generous bonuses can help even out a lower-than-expected salary offer. Don't forget to ask about eligibility criteria and details on how you can earn the rewards.

Does the company have a retirement program?

The job you accept now will affect your financial future one way or another. Ask about retirement plans and any available 401 (k) programs. If you have an existing 401 (k), you'll want to know about contributions, where that money goes, and how it's invested.

Retirement programs are part of the compensation package, so don't be afraid to ask all the questions you need to understand your options. This is a very standard question to ask before accepting a job, so don't be shy!

Can unused vacation time roll over to the following year?

Vacation time is valuable, but policies can be confusing. You might earn a decent amount of vacation time and PTO. But what happens if you don't use it all?

Some companies let it roll over to the following year. However, others have a “use it or lose it” policy. You might even have the option to receive a bonus in lieu of taking time off.

How much time do I have to accept the job?

Whether or not you accept this job is a major decision. You don't want to rush it! If you're fielding offers from multiple companies, you might want to hold off on providing an answer just yet.

However, the company interested in hiring you can't wait forever. If you wait too long, they could rescind their offer and move on to the next candidate.

Asking this question when you get a job offer will help you understand how long you have to think through your options.

How is success measured for this position?

This is one of the best questions to ask before accepting a job offer, but many people overlook it. What you consider successful might not be the same as what the company thinks.

Some organizations use detailed performance analytics. Others take a more holistic approach.

Understanding where this company lies is crucial. It ensures that you know how to reach your full potential in the position and make sure the hiring manager is pleased with their decision.

How many hours will I realistically be working each week?

If you're working a salaried position, you're getting paid for what you do, not how long you're there. Asking about how many hours you'll likely work is paramount.

A company might expect you to work upwards of 50 or 60 hours a week. However, another offer might only require you to work 30 or 40. Suddenly, the value of the compensation plan becomes more apparent when you know how much you'll need to work.

Furthermore, asking this question before accepting a job offer helps you understand what type of work/life balance you can expect.

How long is the initial training period for this role?

We've already touched on the onboarding process. However, this question focuses more on the hands-on training you'll receive.

There are a few reasons you might want to know how long you'll train. The company might offer a different pay rate during that time. Or, you may have limited opportunities to earn commissions or bonuses.

Time is money, so you should always go into your first few weeks fully understanding what to expect.

What will my schedule look like on a daily basis?

A hiring manager can't tell you what you'll do every second of every day, but they can provide some insight into what the typical workday is like.

That might include a few hours at your desk, an hour or two in meetings, etc. Whatever the case may be, you want to know! The answer to this question will help you understand if the daily grind works for you.

What kinds of benefits are offered?

Of course, you can't forget to ask about the benefits. Don't focus on the base salary alone. Non-monetary benefits can sweeten the deal tremendously.

Oftentimes, companies will use benefits to offset lower salaries. For example, you might have modest pay, but you'll save money in the long run, thanks to fantastic healthcare. Always look at the entire compensation package, including the benefits.

What are my weekly job responsibilities?

You might think you know what the job will look like, but it's not until you understand weekly responsibilities that things become crystal clear.

Asking this question when you've been offered a job will help you understand what's expected from you on a weekly basis. It's not uncommon for new hires to experience a phenomenon known as “scope creep.” The responsibilities can slowly expand beyond the job description.

That's something you want to know before you start.

Who can I reach out to on the team for guidance or advice?

Here's another team-related question you should ask before accepting a job offer. Ask about any available contacts you can turn to if you need help.

There's no doubt that you'll have tons of questions during your first few weeks on the job. Knowing who you can call for assistance makes all the difference.

What are the main goals I should focus on in the first 12 months of this role?

After you understand your immediate responsibilities, ask about long-term goals.

Every job is unique, and you need to understand where to focus your attention. What are your position's objectives? Are there goals you need to meet?

It's better to know those details before heading into your first day.

May I have this offer in writing?

It's always a good idea to get your offer and all the finer details in writing. It's one thing for a hiring manager to say that you're getting all these sweet perks. But at the end of the day, you want all of that documented.

Having the offer in writing can save you a world of headaches later and also protect your job.

When are new employees eligible to receive benefits?

Asking this question before accepting a job offer is very important, but many job seekers forget to! In most cases, benefits don't kick in right away. For example, health insurance usually goes into effect 90 days after employment. It all depends on the organization and the policies they use.

You need to know this information to prepare for the worst-case scenario. It's always good to have backup insurance during that brief transition period.

What is the expected start date?

Whether you'll be working at a new office or working from home with a remote job, you need to know hard start dates. Get the exact information about your first day so that you can make plans and put in any notices.

What are my daily job responsibilities?

It's not uncommon to see vague job descriptions when you're looking for something new. You might see some broad goals and duties, but the everyday operations are kept secret. Sometimes, that's by design to avoid scaring potential applicants.

Ask about what you'll be doing every day. What are your typical responsibilities, and what does the company expect from you every day?

Are relocation expenses covered?

If this position requires relocation, don't forget to ask about expenses associated with the move once you've been offered a job. Whether you're moving to another city or across the nation, relocating your entire life isn't cheap.

Many companies will cover relocation expenses as part of a hiring package. Make sure to get those details in writing, too.

Is there room for advancement?

There's a good chance that this position is not your end-all-be-all goal. It's likely a stepping stone to something greater. Unfortunately, not every company (or role) provides opportunities to grow.

This is one of the best questions to ask before accepting a job offer because it could impact your long-term career growth. See if the company invests in employee growth and whether they promote from within. The answer you get could make you rethink accepting the job.

If there's any hesitation, take it as a red flag. Hiring managers know that advancement opportunities are important, so ask all the questions you need.

Is the salary negotiable?

The company might extend an offer with a set salary and benefits. Before you rush and accept the job, ask if the pay is negotiable.

Do your own research about this position and what it pays for your area. Look at competitors and do your due diligence to have a figure in mind. Ideally, you'll do all of that before you even go into an interview.

Once you get the offer, you can start negotiations and get the salary you deserve. That is, however, if the company is flexible enough for salary talks.

Would it be possible to meet some of the members of my team before I start?

You never know what kind of work environment you'll be in until you start your first day. Hiring managers and interviewers want to paint the company in as good a light as possible. As a result, they might not be realistic regarding team dynamics and collaborative efforts.

See if you can meet some members of the team before you accept the job. That way, you can get a feel for the culture and determine if you'll fit in.

What is the company dress code?

Another question to ask when you get a job offer centers around the dress code. Dress codes aren't usually deal-breakers. There are plenty of creative ways to express yourself while maintaining a professional appearance.

But one thing you don't want is to come to work unprepared! Ask about dress codes early so that you have plenty of time to shop and create outfits that meet all requirements.

Questions to Ask Yourself

Not every question you should ask before accepting a job offer should be directed at hiring managers.

After searching for weeks or months, getting a job offer is a huge relief. But that doesn't necessarily mean that the position is right for you.

Here are some questions you should ask yourself after getting a job offer to determine if it's a position you should accept.

Does this job excite me?

If you have any reluctance about this job at all, it might not be a good idea to accept it (unless you don't have the financial luxury to pass on it).

Your career should excite you. It needs to challenge you and utilize all the skills you worked so hard to obtain. Ultimately, it needs to excite you!

Is this a job that you'll feel good doing? Or is it something you'll grow to dread?

Does the company have a good reputation?

Always do your due diligence. While hiring managers look over your resume and perform background searches about you, do the same thing about the company.

You don't want to work at a company with a bad reputation. That reflects poorly on you, but it could spell trouble in the future. The last thing you want is to accept a job at an organization in such bad shape that it'll close its doors within a year!

Do all the research you can and make sure the company aligns with your values and goals.

Does the salary work for me?

Money isn't everything, but it's naive to think it's not a major deciding factor. Think long and hard about your lifestyle and financial responsibilities to come up with a reasonable desired salary.

Maybe you're looking to buy a house or pay down student loans. You may even have a lifestyle you've grown accustomed to over the last few years. Does the salary for this new job support all that?

What is the company culture?

Company culture is important but often overlooked, which is why we recommend asking yourself this question before accepting any job offer. Every organization has a unique culture that's dictated from the bottom down. Poor management, awful attitudes, and problematic behavior creep their way through an entire company.

The work environment can make or break your experience. It's the difference between feeling happy and supported to feeling like it's a nightmare every time you step into the office.

You can learn more about a company's culture through research. Try speaking to some existing employees, too. Make sure that the culture meshes with your values and ethics.

Is the commute manageable?

A long commute can make an otherwise amazing job feel like a huge drag.

Consider how you'll get to work and how long it'll take. If you have to drive an hour each way every day, you might end up resenting the job.

If the commute is too far, see if you can work remotely some days. That might help make things more manageable. But if that's not an option, you may want to reconsider the position.

Will I be challenged in this role?

Every job should challenge you. You never want to feel complacent or uninspired. Navigating tough challenges and finding unique solutions to work problems is what makes you grow.

Your career should push your skills further and further. Think about your current capabilities and compare them to the expectations of this new job. If you have no way to challenge yourself, it might not be the job for you. Ask yourself this question whenever you're offered a job, and be honest with yourself.

Will this job get me closer to my long-term career goals?

Finally, consider how this position will impact your long-term goals.

As mentioned earlier, every job should be a stepping stone to something greater. It can take years or decades to reach the pinnacle of your career path. However, this position should help you get there!

Make sure it provides you with the necessary skills and advancement opportunities to continue climbing your career ladder.

Conclusion

Now that you're familiar with the best questions to ask before accepting a job interview, don't feel bad about bringing them up!

It's never unreasonable to ask questions about the future of your career.

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Stuck in your job? Get free assistance from an American Corporate Partners' career mentor

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Veterans should verify the information with the organization offering.

In 2023, a record number of post-9/11 Veterans found meaningful employment with their American Corporate Partner (ACP) Mentor's assistance for free, with an average starting salary of more than $93,000. ACP can help you find a new position, get promoted and grow your civilian network.

How to get started

Visit acp-usa.org and fill out a short online application. Answer questions about your career goals, military experience, and mentoring preferences.

What to expect after applying?

  • ACP will reach out within 24 hours and schedule a 15-minute phone call to ask a few more questions to match each Veteran with the right mentor.
  • ACP will introduce you to a mentor within several weeks of your application to the program and will check in throughout the year to provide customized resources and ensure positive outcomes. 98% of Veterans would recommend ACP.
  • All post-9/11 Veterans who have served at least 180 days of active duty since 9/11 are eligible.
  • ACP's weekly LinkedIn Live series connects Veterans directly to partner companies and hiring managers.
  • ACP's LinkedIn Group, ACP Connects, offers employment opportunities from military-ready employers and professional development resources.

Apply Now »

ACP will hand-pick a Mentor based on your career interests and professional history. You and your Mentor will create a tailored action plan for the mentorship and speak monthly to make progress on your goals, and ACP staff will help guide you through the mentorship experience to ensure success.

Whether you are actively searching for a new career or newly employed and looking for advice about how to be successful in your new role and advance, ACP's customized program is designed to assist you on your path toward rewarding, meaningful employment.

Typical mentorship topics include:

  • Resume review and interview preparation
  • Career exploration
  • Work-life balance
  • Networking
  • Small business development
  • Leadership and professional communication

ACP's staff personally pairs every applicant, hand-picking a Mentor for each Protege based on career compatibility, experience level, location and personal interests. Every Mentor and Protege has a phone call with an ACP staff member to communicate preferences, which are considered during the pairing process.

Join our free, personalized career mentorship program and experience a yearlong mentorship to assist you with your civilian career goals at acp-usa.org.

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17 Good Questions To Ask A Recruiter In 2024

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Knowing the best questions to ask recruiters can make your job search simpler and save time for everyone involved. But a lot of job-seekers aren't sure how to approach recruiters when it comes to finding out information about a company or position.

Fortunately, we've put together this list of questions to make the process easy. Give it a read before your next talk with a recruiter!

Can you provide more information about the interview process?

Preparing for what lies ahead in the hiring process is always a good thing. If you're seeking job opportunities from multiple companies, you need to know how to plan your interview strategy. It's also crucial to understand the hiring timeline.

For example, some companies will go through several rounds of interviews that could take weeks. Some may even require a security clearance that could take months. All of that information is critical.

Recruiters are usually more than willing to provide this information. Generally, they'll talk about the rough timeline, when you can expect to hear back, etc. They may even give you the names and LinkedIn profiles of the people you'll be talking to.

How long has the job been open?

This is one of the best questions to ask recruiters because it provides valuable insight. It's about reading between the lines and getting a good idea of what to expect.

If the position is newly opened, you may be one of the first people interviewing for it. That could be a good thing, but it could also indicate that the hiring manager is in the early stages of fielding candidates. As a result, it might be a while until they make an official offer.

On the opposite side of the spectrum, a job available for several months could be a red flag. It could indicate that several other applicants passed on the offer, or it might mean that the hiring manager is indecisive or looking for something super specific.

How would you describe the company culture?

It's easy to get a rough idea of the type of work you'll do when looking at a job description. But that doesn't necessarily mean it's the right fit for you.

Company culture matters, and it could be the thing that makes or breaks your success. Incompatible work styles could make you feel miserable every day if it's not a good match.

For example, some work cultures are all about the grind. Alternatively, you could walk into a more relaxed environment that's looser than what you're used to. Either way, this is all information you need to know to decide if the hiring process is worth pursuing. It's an important question to ask recruiters (or at least ask at the end of an interview).

What does a normal day look like for this job?

This is another question to ask recruiters that provides more insight than it might seem at face value. Recruiters may not know everything about a position, but they likely have a decent amount of information they can share. Every bit counts.

Their answer could unveil more about the day-to-day operations. It could give you a glimpse of how your work-life balance might be. You may even learn about ongoing projects or the types of people you'll interact with regularly.

What skills are needed in order to succeed in this role?

A job posting gives you some idea of what hiring managers are looking for, but it rarely paints the entire picture. Here's where you get to learn more about the position and the types of qualifications you might need to succeed.

This is a good question to ask a recruiter because it will help you determine how qualified you are to apply for this position and whether it's something you want to pursue. Even if you don't have every necessary skill at the moment, you can use this information to be strategic about your interview and resume. Highlight the most relevant skills and make sure you stand out as an applicant (and consider doing some additional training to develop the skills you don't have).

Why is this position open?

You might not think the past is irrelevant, but learning everything about this position makes a big difference. Asking this question to recruiters can give you helpful information about what you're walking into and the organization itself.

For example, you may learn that the organization is moving in another direction, and you'd be responsible for that transition.

There's a lot to learn about the role dynamics, and asking this question can give you the insight you need.

Has this role been created, or would I be filling an existing position?

If you're lucky enough to apply for a newly created role, you don't have any shoes to fill. However, there are still standards to meet. This question can help you learn about company expectations.

It encourages the recruiter to tell you why the position was created and what the company expects to gain from it. Are there clear definitions for this role, or is there flexibility to mold it how you see fit? That information matters and can change your entire approach when it comes to trying to land the job.

What are some of the common career tracks for individuals in this job?

Ideally, you don't want to stay in the same position forever. At some point, you'll want to advance your career. How does this position fit into that plan?

Asking about what former employees go on to do after leaving this role tells you a lot (this also made our list of questions to ask at a career fair).

You can learn about what skills you obtain in this role, what you can do with it afterward, and how it fits into the bigger picture. It also unveils some information about the company, such as whether they like to promote from within or if they treat this position as more of a transitory role.

Can you provide more information about the position?

This is a fairly broad question to ask recruiters, but that's by design. The goal here is to learn as much as possible about what type of job you're trying to land. A job posting only provides so much information.

There are many nuances to every open position. This is your chance to gain more insight.

Recruiters usually have a good grasp of the job and can provide more detailed information. The answer you get may lead to other questions. It's a great way to get the conversation rolling while learning everything you need to know.

What is the expected interview dress code?

First impressions matter with job interviews. How you dress could create a lasting impact on what interviewers think of you. The last thing you want is to underdress or overdress.

If a company is relaxed and doesn't “do” suits and ties, dressing to the nines could make you look like the wrong fit for the company culture. The opposite applies to showing up in jeans and a tee for an interview at a super formal company. This is a good question for interviewers because they will usually be able to steer you in the right direction if they have experience with the company you'll be applying to.

Does this job have the option for remote work?

Remote work is becoming increasingly common around the world, so it's perfectly reasonable to ask about this policy. It is a deal-breaker for many people!

Think about your preferred work environment. The answer to this question could help you decide if you want to continue or back out of the hiring process.

Many companies these days offer hybrid work policies that allow you to spend some time working remotely and some time in the office. Get all the clarity you need to ensure that this is the job for you.

How quickly does the company want to fill this job?

Finding a job can be just as demanding as having one. The only difference is that you're not getting paid for the former!

This question to ask a recruiter will help you understand the urgency of the hiring process. Companies that need it filled ASAP are more inclined to have fewer interviews. They may make an offer quickly, ushering you through the onboarding process faster (or being more willing to negotiate when it comes to salary and benefits).

If that's the case, you may want to prioritize this interview over others. Companies that aren't pressed for time may take months to extend an offer. That would tell you it's important to keep looking for other opportunities as well as this one.

How long have you been working with this company?

This is a good question to ask recruiters, even though it sometimes catches them off guard.

A recruiter that has worked with a particular company for a while can provide more insight into the culture and the interview process. Maybe they've worked with the hiring manager for years and can give you some tips on how to leave a positive impression.

They can also tell you about managerial styles, workplace culture, benefits, and more. They're you're “in” with this organization, so don't be afraid to ask these questions.

What qualities are you looking for in a new hire?

We're not talking about hard skills and base qualifications here. Every hiring manager looks for soft skills that could make or break an individual's success in this position.

For example, they might look for someone who can take charge, solve complex challenges, and be proactive enough to get work done as quickly as possible. Or, they may want someone who goes with the flow and is easy to collaborate with on important projects.

The answer to this question can put you ahead of the curve and give you the information you need to plan your interview response.

What is the salary range for this position?

Of course, you'll want to ask about the salary. There's nothing worse than going through an entire interview process to realize that the pay is well under what you expect. Avoid that disappointment and ask this question upfront.

Some recruiters are hesitant to provide an answer. Don't worry: There's no need to negotiate (that comes later).

The goal here is to have a better idea of whether the salary fits your expectations or not. Depending on the answer, you could even use what you learn as leverage if you get a job offer.

Do you know anything about the team I'll be working with and how they operate?

If this job requires you to work closely with a team, it's important to ask this question to the recruiter you're working with. The answer will shed more light on your daily operations and the work culture as a whole.

There's a good chance that you'll walk into an already established team. Can you fit in, and what will your day-to-day be?

Ask about the team size, the direction it's headed in, and more. You can also inquire about past or present projects it's working on.

What is the hiring manager like?

As you probably know, the recruiter is not the person who is directly responsible for hiring you. That falls onto the hiring manager. They will interview you and oversee the entire hiring process.

Getting to know a little more about them can come in handy. Not all recruiters have a working relationship with hiring managers. But if this one does, they may have enough insight to tell you about their inner workings.

They can provide tips on how to impress, warnings about what to expect, and other relevant information you want in your back pocket.

Most of these questions work best for internal recruiters (recruiters who are employees of the company hiring). You can ask some of these questions if you are talking to a 3rd party recruiter (someone who works for a recruiting firm or outside business), though they may not have enough information to answer.

Conclusion

Being familiar with the best questions to ask interviewers will come in handy when it's time to talk. By the time you're done with your conversation, you should have plenty of helpful information to aid you moving forward!

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Free farming and beekeeping opportunities for Veterans

By VA Careers | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2024, Reprinted with permission

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA. Veterans should verify the information with the organization offering.

Many Veterans are finding farming and beekeeping to be therapeutic and meaningful, and this work often comes with a community Veterans can rely on. A variety of free opportunities exclusively for Veterans interested in beekeeping or agricultural programs are listed below. If you know of any other, please list it in the comments so we can include.

Farming

U.S. Department of Agriculture Military Veterans Agricultural Liaison

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides financial, educational, or business and training resources through a variety of programs aimed at Veterans. USDA wants to ensure that Veterans looking to return home or start a new career on a farm or in a rural community have the tools and opportunities they need to succeed.

Military Veterans Agricultural Liaison (MVAL), managed by USDA, helps Veterans connect to agricultural employment, education, and entrepreneurship on the farm and beyond by:

  • Coordinating with the USDA Human Resources Office to help Veterans and their spouses find employment at USDA agencies.
  • Connecting Veterans with paid apprenticeships through USDA and the Department of Labor.
  • Connecting Veterans to nonprofit and other partners who can provide them with training and hands-on experience in agriculture.
  • Working with VA to help Veterans gain valuable civilian work experience through non-paid internships with USDA agencies.
  • Sharing information about more than 40 loan, grant and technical assistance programs.

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Center For Rural Affairs — Veterans in Agriculture Workshop Series

Military Veterans interested in agriculture are invited to attend a series of on-farm and virtual workshops. A new 3-year series from 2024-2026 highlights agritourism. In 2024, "Agritourism through Farm Stores" starts Feb. 19 and runs through August, rotating between online classroom sessions and on-farm sessions with an online option. Programming is funded through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), through the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Farmers Assisting Returning Military (F.A.R.M)

F.A.R.M. offers the Future Farmer Internship available to Veterans, serving to help them find peace, purpose and opportunity through therapeutic agriculture training. At the end of the internship, Veterans will be prepared to start or expand their own farm through regenerative farming practices, agribusiness, crop planning, marketing and other learned skills.

The internships supports three main areas: agriculture, living and alternative.

  • "Agriculture" provides structure and purpose while challenging the Veteran mentally and physically with daily farming activities.
  • "Living" offers horseback riding, hiking, camping, paddling, biking, hunting, fishing, climbing, repelling, diving and off-roading. Dinners, barbecues and fire pits on the farm create a therapeutic environment during real life situations.
  • "Alternative" provides holistic health and alternative medicine coaches to help create a healthy body, peaceful spirit and sound mind through hard work, whole food-based diet and physical fitness.

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Farmer Veteran Coalition

Cultivating a new generation of farmers and food leaders and developing viable employment and meaningful careers through the collaboration of the farming and military communities. Programs available to Veterans include:

  • Farmer Veteran Fellowship Fund, a small grant program to assist Veterans in the beginning years of farming and ranching.
  • The Homegrown by Heroes Label (HBH), which informs consumers that agriculture products were produced by U.S. military Veterans.
  • Membership discounts is free to all Veterans and provides exclusive access to discounts from agricultural suppliers and service providers.

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Fields 4 Valor Farms

An apprentice program that provides hands-on farming experience and education to post-9/11 Veterans interested in starting their own small-scale farm that focuses on fruit and vegetable crops, along with beekeeping and raising small animals.

Veterans willing to commit to working two full days a week for 12 months will receive a monthly stipend.

Fields 4 Valor Farms grows and delivers vegetables, eggs and honey to local Veteran families in their goal to end Veteran hunger.

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Armed to Farm

Armed to Farm has supported more than 1,000 Veterans from 47 states with hands-on and classroom learning opportunities. Farmer Veterans learn how to make a business plan and market their products, how to access USDA programs, set business goals and develop mentorships with seasoned farmers. There are three training series currently available:

  • Flagship: Weeklong, hands-on and classroom training for new farmers.
  • Armed to Urban Farm, which focuses on Veterans who are new farmers in urban areas.
  • Armed to Farm 2.0, where Veteran must complete a weeklong session prior to attending this training series. This is an in-depth course on business planning, financial management, marketing and scaling-up production (includes hand-on activities).

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Veterans Healing Farm

Founded in 2013 to enhance the mental, emotional and physical well-being of Veterans and their families. Some of the events and workshops offered throughout the year include equine therapy, canine therapy, medicinal herbs, art therapy, music therapy, canning and jam making, mushroom growing, organic gardening, suicide prevention, mental health first aid and much more.

Everything grown at the farm is donated back to the Veteran community.

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Veterans to Farmers

Located in Colorado, this organization offers training programs in market farming, hydroponics, urban farming (backyard farming) and business planning. Veterans may also bring guests with them for urban farming courses (free of charge). These programs are a combination of on-the-job training and classroom time. At the completion of all these programs, each Veteran will receive a Certificate of Completion recognized by Colorado State University’s Extension Office.

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Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture (CCUA) — Veterans Urban Farm

Truman VA Hospital Veterans can participate in vocational rehabilitation or recreational therapy through Veterans Urban Farm (located in Missouri). Produce grown on site is donated to local Veterans and is used in health focused programming at the VA hospital.

Veterans Urban Farm apprenticeship is open to all Veterans. Paid apprentices work on the farm for one growing season learning a variety of skills.

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Beekeeping

Heroes to Hives (H2H)

Offered through Michigan State University Extension, this free hybrid learning program offers online courses as well hands-on education experiences. All hands-on courses are offered in Michigan. The unique program seeks to address financial and personal wellness of Veterans through professional training and community development.

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Bee Veterans

This beekeeping for Veterans program is offered through the University of Minnesota for free for all Minnesota Veterans. This program offers workshops, field trips to visit commercial beekeepers and an open house at the Bee Lab. Participants will be provided with protective equipment, but can choose to bring their own. Workshops include instruction on basic beekeeping techniques, tips on seasonal bee management, knowledge of honeybee biology and the connection between people and pollinators.

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Hives for Heroes

This non-profit organization focuses on providing a healthy transition from service through sustainability and conservation. Active duty service members, Veterans and first responders with little to no beekeeping experience are welcome and will be paired with a local mentor. Local mentors will teach hands-on training at their respective apiary (location where beehives are kept).

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Honeybee Initiative for Veterans Empowerment and Support (HIVES)

Within VA health care, a new program called Honeybee Initiative for Veterans Empowerment and Support (HIVES) is being piloted. HIVES mission is to empower Veterans to use beekeeping to manage their overall well-being, while supporting VA employees in facilitating a wellness-based beekeeping program. This new program is currently being offered at the Manchester VAMC, the Kansas City VAMC, and the Palo Alto VAMC through their respective Recreation Therapy Clinics.

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